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A bridge or dslr?

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by angelxx36, Jul 3, 2013.

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  1. angelxx36

    angelxx36 New Member

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    I am a very enthusiastic photographer and am learning all about it at moment. I currently have a compact camera but would like to upgrade. Is a bridge camera the best thing to get next and learn all the stuff on there or should I get a dslr now?

    sent from my lush note 2
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    It depends on what you want to do with a new camera.
    If you want the best image quality for the price, a larger camera, a wide array of manual controls and the ability to change lenses, a DSLR is the appropriate purchase.

    If you want a larger camera with manual controls that has one very long range lens, that can also take close macro shots, you should consider a non-compact ultrazoom. If you want a pocket sized camera that has the one long lens, a compact ultrazoom may be for you. But keep in mind that ultrazooms don't have appreciably better image quality than compact cameras.
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Another important factor is photo editing. Both a bridge camera and a DSLR can take a JPG image. But the results will be slightly different. The JPG processing in the bridge camera is programmed to produce a snappy image, ready for use without editing. Which will not always succeed, some images will need a little tweaking with an editor. The DSLR JPG processing gives a more natural image, not as snappy. Some DSLR fans like it that way. But for many folks this means that with a DSLR every image will need a little additional editing. And RAW with a DSLR is a whole other game. Any RAW image absolutely requires further processing with an editor, RAW images are limp as a dishrag without editing.

    Long way of saying that if you are ready to get serious about editing, DSLR (or mirrorless) is the way to go. If you really don't want to fuss with editing, stick with the bridge cameras.

    Kelly Cook
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2013
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