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A nice camera for a trip..

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by rglezp, May 20, 2013.

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  1. rglezp

    rglezp New Member

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    Well hello,

    I'm looking for a camera good enough for get some nice pics from my vacations, I really want to have a decent quality images (a bit more than a simple point and shot) so I'm willing to spend up to ~650 USD. My fist choice is the Fuji X20, I find it very well built, and with a couple of nice options to play with them, it could be a uprange point and shot or maybe a compact system. Anyway, I really look forward for your advice and opinions!

    Thanks in advace.
     
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    They lack viewfinders, but I would also consider the Olympus PL5 and Sony RX100 for this.

    Kelly Cook
     
  3. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The Fuji X20 is in the class of cameras known as enthusiast point and shoots. These are considered point and shoot cameras because they don't feature interchangeable lens capability - you only get one lens. In the Fuji X20, as well as the other enthusiast point and shoots, the quality of construction is very high, the camera has manual exposure controls, the sensor is better than that of regular point and shoot cameras (for better image quality including in low light) and the lens is very good. Enthusiast point and shoot cameras are priced higher than other point and shoots - some as high as a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera (such as the Olympus E-PL5 or the Sony NEX 3n) or an introductory level DSLR (like the Nikon D3200). So it's worth considering whether a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera or a DSLR might be a better alternative to a similarly priced enthusiast point and shoot.

    Assuming the enthusiast point and shoot is what you want there are several excellent models out there, including the Fuji X20. There's also the Canon G15 and S110, the Nikon P7700, the Olympus XZ-2 iHS, the Panasonic LX7, the Samsung EX2f and the Sony RX100.

    The Fuji X20 and Canon G15 both have a built-in tunnel viewfinder, while the Olympus, Panasonic and Samsung give you the option of adding an electronic viewfinder (which increases the bulk factor of the camera). Another thing you may want to consider is size and weight - while none of the cameras are particularly large, the Canon S110 and Sony RX100 are the smallest and lightest. The lens range is worth considering since you can't change lenses. The Nikon P7700 has the greatest range - 7x, followed by the two Canons at 5x, the Fuji and Olympus at 4x, the Panasonic at 3.8x, the Samsung at 3.3x and the Sony at 3.2x.

    This website has reviewed several of the above enthusiast point and shoots and all fared very well. Here are links to the reviews:
    Canon G15
    Canon PowerShot G15 Review: A Professional's Point and Shoot
    Nikon P7700
    Nikon Coolpix P7700 Review
    Olympus XZ-2
    Olympus Stylus XZ-2 Review
    Samsung EX2f
    Samsung EX2F Review: Retro Street Shooter
    Sony RX100
    Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-RX100 Review: Simply Amazing
     
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