Aspect ratio settings

Discussion in 'Photography' started by gglassmeyer, Jul 28, 2008.

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  1. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    If you generally want to make 4x6 inch prints from your photos, do you commonly just set the aspect ratio to 3:2 on the camera, or do you shoot at the camera's highest megapixel setting and crop images to a 4x6 inch size for printing.

    I'm assuming it's more convenient to have them already in the 3:2 ratio, but I'm not sure if there's any drawback to doing so. I also don't generally view them on a television screen where a 4:3 or 16:9 ratio would be preferred.
     
  2. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) Well-Known Member

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    The majority of camera default to 4:3 and i print them out at 4x6

    I have a full HD 16:9 camcorder that takes 2MP 16:9 images and it is impossible to find a company to print them out on 16:9 paper at a reasonable price

    I would stick to 4:3 which will most likely be your camera maximum resolution.

    And you can always crop them to 16:9 if you want.
     
  3. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    if you send a 4:3 print to like WinkFlash or some other online photo printing site, and have them print them as 4x6 in prints, they get cropped at the right side and the bottom slightly and can mess up composition. That's why I'm thinking it may be best to just to shoot at the ratio you're most likely to print.
     
  4. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) Well-Known Member

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    If you go to the UK website. http://www.bonusprint.co.uk/ website

    You download the software and if you load a 16:9 image, you can set it to keep a white boarder at the top and the bottom on a 4x6 print so there is no cropping.

    EDIT : looks like it`s an online java service, not a download.
     
  5. David Rasnake

    David Rasnake News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    The 16:9 aspect ratio question aside, if you want to compose at 4x6 without worrying about post-shot cropping and you're only wanting to shoot for 4x6, I'd go ahead and shoot in 3:2. You won't miss the extra resolution if printing 4x6s is your only concern.

    dr
     
  6. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    Thanks, that's what I thought, but I wasn't sure if there was some reason to avoid this practice. We rarely make an 8x10 but other than that it's 4x6s until my wife cuts and crops them for scrapbooks. Sometimes I wonder why I try to compose shots at all. My wife focuses only on the subject and nothing else. I routinely have my head lopped off, when standing near my children.
     
  7. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    Thats no big deal - your head is not an important part of the picture.
     
  8. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    Yeah, I have this strange need to ride a horse through Sleepy Hollow at night.
     
  9. ajaynejr

    ajaynejr Active Member

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    Cropping problems go all the way back to the film days. You would frame a picture quite closely but the photofinisher crops all four edges leaving heads cut off on the print although not on the negative. Or you leave extra background anticipating the the photofinisher will crop the edges but he does not and now you have a small subject on a big background.

    Cropping just the right side and the bottom adds to the unpredictabilities.

    You will have to choose one photofinisher and frame/shoot your pictures to match how he crops things.

    Also beware of software (and photofinishers) that morph (stretch/squish) the picture to match the aspect ratio of the print.

    Digital camera hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/digicam.htm
     
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