Best Configuration to shoot in fog

Discussion in 'Photography' started by rowman, Feb 6, 2010.

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  1. rowman

    rowman Well-Known Member

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    Hi there,

    What is your opinion about the best shooting conditions for extreme foggy day and night?
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    For one thing you don't want to use the flash as it will reflect off the fog. Otherwise, it depends on the amount of light available. If there is sufficient light Auto would probably work. If not you may have to shoot in Program mode with a higher ISO or shoot in aperture priority mode with a wide aperture.
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    For fog I would be tempted to dial in + 1/3 or 1/2 EV compensation. It's typical for DSLR cameras to provide the 1/2 stop setting, don't expect this on a point-and-shoot camera. If the camera provides it, also ramp up the image contast and saturation (which corresponds to the typical Landscape Scene mode). A Clear or UV filter for lens protection is not a bad idea. Dunno about circular polarizers, something to check into.

    Kelly Cook
     
  4. rowman

    rowman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the response.

    For the auto shooting and Av, often I have this problem that exposure compensation does not work, I mean I decrease it by -1EV but still the camera exposes with the same parameters in 0EV. So I actually switch to manual most of the time. The Tv does not have this problem. strange:confused:

    for the compensation, I always had to dial -1 or -2 EV as it always tends to over expose the sky (SX120).

    actually i did not do this in the shooting but in the post processing I did it and the results are way better, now.

    there is a problem with the noise. even at the ISO 80 I have much more noise compared to non fog situation and I reduced them to some extent with the Guassian blur tool in gimp, but I wonder if there is a better way to do this or sth to take in to consideration before exposure.

    Thanks,
     
  5. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Right. It's common for cameras to ignore the EV compensations in Auto mode and also in any Scene modes. I'm a little surprised that the Av mode does not use EV.

    Sorry, but -2 EV compensation is EXTREME. Work on your metering technique so that the bright sky does not swamp the result. There are a number of different ways to do this. My favorite is to first point the camera at a different subject that is evenly lit. Lock the camera on that exposure setting. For some cameras this can be done with a AE lock control, some will require Manual mode. Then reframe the shot the way you wanted. Of course if the sky is not exceptionally bright these steps are not needed.

    Right again. My suggestion was made to minimize the PP needed. But if you are more comfortable doing it in PP, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that approach.

    That one puzzles me. Hopefully somebody with a SX120 will help.

    Kelly
     
  6. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    At ISO 80 what you're seeing is not noise. My guess is that the camera failed to focus properly resulting in a soft, blurry photo.
     
  7. rowman

    rowman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the remarks.

    This is not the case all the time but exists and specially when using flash.

    Probably you are right. because this was not always the case (although most of the time) and I can not remember if the camera was focused properly or not. This is a sample picture with this case:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rowman_aperture/4337966708/
    Probably because of the lower contrast it has been more difficult for the camera to focus properly.

    I have another question about the manual focus. The camera is capable of doing that but really is difficult to tune it as the LCD is terrible in this case. I wonder what is the best way in doing that. I have some good results by approximately tuning that. the camera meters are: infinity, 5 m, 2m, 1m, and smaller measures. I tuned it by approximately measuring the camera distance and the object and quite acceptable I guess. There is not actually a gradual continuous change in focus as far as I understood.

    Thanks for the information,
     
  8. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Actually that's a very nice picture you took. I don't think there's anything wrong with it at all. The soft look of the photo is a result of the fog - I think it results in a very beautiful effect.
     
  9. rowman

    rowman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. It was not like this before Gaussian blurring. there were a lot of grainy dots in it which were removed by this filter. Anyway no idea maybe it is the fog effect.
     
  10. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I like your fog shot too. My only nit-pick is that the tone of the blue sky is not quite what I would expect in fog. As for noise, we would need to see a 100% crop that is straight from the camera.

    And on the manual focus issue, that is typical for compacts. Carry a measuring tape. Manual focus on the SLR-like ultrazooms is quite a bit better than a compact, still not as nice as a DSLR. For that matter, at the consumer price level, even a DSLR is not as nice for manual focus as an old time 35mm SLR. The pro level DSLRs have replaceable focusing screens and all the other tricks.

    Kelly
     
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