Best Lenses for Wedding photography

Discussion in 'Lenses and Accessories' started by Justin T Smith, Nov 11, 2009.

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  1. Justin T Smith

    Justin T Smith New Member

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    Okay so i'm waiting on some money from student loans to get a Canon 50 D. And i'm getting the Canon EOS 16-35mm f/2.8 L USM Lens. Its an Ultra Wide angle Lens. (Incase your unawaire) But I was wondering some other lenses I should look towards getting in the future. Price range isn't to slim, I could go decently high, its a profession i'm trying to keep deep into and i'm taking it very seriously. If you could help me out, that'd be wonderful.

    And another question I have is Whats some good lenses for more so People pictures, I wouldn't say portraits so much, like how you get for your senior year, but more so every day events. Something with lots of depth. As I said. Money isn't a problem, especially for this. I know both of my questions kind of go hand and hand with each other. But i'm just clarifying both just incase.

    If I had to give a price rand i'd say anywhere from 1000, to 1800.

    If you could help me out, that'd be wonderful, Thank you very much.


    Justin Smith
     
  2. Nicky2007

    Nicky2007 Well-Known Member

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    Justin,

    If you're going into people photography, a 16mm-35mm lens may not be the best choice. To me, that lens would be more suitable for landscape photography. A 28mm - 200mm zoom lens would be better in this case. You need a moderate wide angle to take group pix & a telephoto zoom for close-ups.

    Cheers.

    Nicky
     
  3. josandler

    josandler New Member

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    For 35mm film and full frame cameras, 85mm is often the best portrait focal length. Because of the 1.6x crop that occurs with smaller sensor cameras, a small sensor equivalent might be the 50mm lens. This of course all depends on the type of portraiture being taken. Longer focal lengths, all the way up to 200mm are great if you have the room maneuver.
     
  4. lokster

    lokster Member

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    55-200mm telephoto zoom lenses would be good even the standard 18-55mm somtimes youl be close sometimes youl be far, weddings are hardly static since people want to greet the bride and groom
     
  5. Logicus

    Logicus Member

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    After killing my Canon 50mm f/1.8, I replaced it with a Sigma 50mm f/1.4... this lens can grab shots at 1/25 sec at ISO400 with not much more than candlelight. Get used to using your feet for the zoom ring, and you'll never take the lens off. The Sigma is much sharper than the soft Canon 50mm f/1.4, and worth the extra $$ (~$500). I picked up a Tamron 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 which is much sharper and well built than I expected to fill in the wide-angle side of things. It does surprisingly well in low light situations as well.

    I still have the original 18-55mm kit lens which is surprisingly good for a $170 lens. I also have the Canon 55-250mm paperweight that is decent enough, I guess. It has IS so you can get decent full tele shots in good daylight. I'd like to pick up a 200mm f/2.8 or a 200-400mm or so zoom at f/2.8. If the money ever pops up somewhere...
     
  6. symondhelly

    symondhelly New Member

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    The lenses I recommended are continuous f2.8 aperture. When shooting events professionally I wouldn't recommend using anything else. Standard lenses change aperture with your zoom and that can diminish your ability to get the right shot exactly how you want it. It changes exposure and everything if you do any zooming which severely diminishes your consistency. I also don't recommend having any sort of automatic ISO setting. Try to stick with 400 or at max 800. If you use f3.5 or more you greatly reduce the amount of light your camera receives which causes you to need either higher ISO more grain, less vibrant color or slower shutter speed fuzzy photos.

    Using a flash is mainly for the sake of getting interesting and artistic shots. If you are shooting documentary style you probably won't need one. I go for artistic and generally would use a second shooter who is good at documenting everything else.
     
  7. canonjen

    canonjen New Member

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    a 24-70 and a 70-200 would be a dream choice for wedding photography
     
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