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Camera for Food Photography

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by lightning, Mar 15, 2014.

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  1. lightning

    lightning New Member

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    Hi, my brother and I would like to start a small business selling food photograpy service since there are many hotels and restaurants in my town will need it to update their menu regularly
    What do you recommend for $1700 budget (camera and lense)
    I'm went to Amazon and thinking of Nikon D7100 but have no idea about the lense
    any suggestion is appreciated
    thank you

    [​IMG]
     
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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  3. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Food photography requires a camera with excellent low light ability. This means a camera with an APS-C sensor. The Nikon D7100 has such as sensor, as do many other cameras, including the less expensive Nikon DSLR's (D3200, D3300, D5200, D5300), Pentax DSLR's (K-500, K-50), Canon DSLR's (T5i, T3), Sony DSLR's (SLT-A58, A3000, A5000) as well as smaller cameras (interchangeable lens cameras, or ILC's) from Samsung, Fuji and Sony. As far as a lens is concerned it's best to use a fast lens with a maximum aperture of less than F/2. For instance Nikon makes a nice 35mm f/1.8 prime lens that can be purchased for under $200. There are similar lenses made for other brands of cameras with APS-C sensors.
     
  4. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Erm, food photography for an enthusiast or food critic needs low light capability. A professional, shooting for the restaurant's menu, is much more likely to do this in a studio setting, where he can add lots of his own lighting. So a pro could even do this with a Micro4/3 camera and kit lens. Whole different approach to photography. :)

    Kelly
     
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