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Can someone please help me find a camera?

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by Needacam, Nov 29, 2013.

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  1. Needacam

    Needacam Member

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    I am buying a camera as a gift but need your help. The person I'm getting this for enjoys both landscape photography and sporting evens (high school football and soccer). This is for an amateur photographer who has used their iPhone up to this point. Which "type" of camera do I need for high quality sports and landscape shots - ones that can be print great 16x20's but potentially larger too. As for a budget, I would like to first learn about the type of camera I need for the uses above before I set a strict budget. I dont need a tiny camera, though something at least semi portable is ideal. Thank you in advance for your help.
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    For high quality sports shots you can't beat a DSLR with a good long zoom lens. However such a setup isn't cheap - prepare to spend at least $700. If you don't mind compromising a bit on image quality a long zoom point and shoot will do a good job on sports as long as it's a quick performer. Long zoom point and shoots come in two different configurations - small pocket sized and larger cameras that look like small DSLR's. The point and shoots range from about $200 to $450.
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    That is a tall order for a novice with any camera. The skill of the photographer will matter much more than the camera selection. The irony is that the more advanced cameras require more skill, not less. A practical approach is to do this by steps. Try a SLR-ultrazoom first (for a modest price). After a year or two with this camera it will be evident whether the interest is enough to warrant investing in a more expensive camera with interchangeable lenses. Sadly, an lot of people rush out to buy a fancy DSLR, and it ends up left behind in the closet.

    Kelly Cook
     
  4. Needacam

    Needacam Member

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    Thank you Kelly, can you please tell me a bit more about the SLR Ultrazoom, are there any different versions I should know about or any options I need to pay particular attention to which offers the better sports or landscape photos?
     
  5. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I'm not Kelly but I know something about SLR-like ultrazooms. While they are point and shoots they look like small DSLR's and have many of the controls of a DSLR, plus the auto controls of a point and shoot. They are mainly distinguished by their very long zoom lenses. They usually have good image quality except in low light and at the long end of the zoom. Most of them are speedy cameras (not as quick as a DSLR though) and will take good looking images of sporting events as long as the lighting is adequate. The top SLR-like ultrazooms are the Panasonic FZ70, the Sony HX300, the Fuji HS50exr, the Nikon P520 and the Canon SX50. The Nikon and Canon have slower shot-to-shot times than the others. An inexpensive SLR-like ultrazoom, which lacks many of the options of the above cameras but is a quality product, is the Canon SX510.
     
  6. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Andy has covered the SLR-like type cameras well. I just want to add that I think the models with the hotshoe feature for an external flash are even more desirable for any earnest student. An awful lot of novices take the position that "natural" light is always superior (somehow?), and that is flat out wrong. The sooner a photographer can get comfortable with flash, the better. Unfortunately not all SLR-like models have a hotshoe.

    Kelly
     
  7. Needacam

    Needacam Member

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    Do either of these two cameras have a hotshoe? Sony HX300 or Fuji HS50EXR
     
  8. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Of the cameras I mentioned only the Fuji HS50EXR and the Canon SX50 have hotshoes.
     
  9. Needacam

    Needacam Member

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    Andy, someone on another forum mentioned the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200, does that rank similar to the cameras you listed a few posts above? Does it have hotshoes?
    Thanks
     
  10. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The FZ200 is a fine camera and comes with a hotshoe. It has a 24x optical zoom lens, less than its competitors. It has a major advantage, though - a constant aperture of F/2.8, which means that the camera will be able to shoot with fast shutter speeds (sharper images) and still get a well-exposed picture.
     
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