Canon or Nikon? Need help ASAP!

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by XxAn63laxX, May 1, 2009.

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  1. XxAn63laxX

    XxAn63laxX Member

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    I'm looking for a new digital camera and I've found 2 at Best Buy (Canon SX110IS Powershot and Nikon Coolpix L100) that are in the same price range ($250-$270)and have the optical zoom I'm looking for. This camera will be used for many indoor wrestling events (WWE, not HS). I need a decent OPTICAL zoom (at least 10x), long battery life, and the ability to take shots of fast action that won't be blurry. The lighting inside the venues I go to is normally pretty bad, so I also need to be able to get a shot that isn't completely dark. I have to make this decision soon, as I need the camera for this upcoming Tuesday.

    I've looked at both cameras at the store and they both are decent. The Canon is smaller, so it's more portable and only takes 2 AA batteries. The Nikon fits better in your hand, but it's larger and takes 4 AA batteries, I'm also concerned because I've read you cannot use rechargeables, or if you do, their life is cut drastically. I'm at such a loss! I don't know what to do.. any thoughts or opinions?

    NIKON http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=9220229&type=product&id=1218061795563

    CANON http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=8965738&type=product&id=1217029991611
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2009
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    If you're an experienced photographer and know how to properly use manual exposure controls, I recommend the Canon SX110is. It will give you the most flexibility in taking those tough, low light action shots (you'll have to use high iso, fast shutter speed and as little zoom as possible to keep the aperture wide enough to let in sufficient light). Also, the Canon SX110is can use rechargeable AA batteries like the Eneloops.

    If you're not familiar with manual controls, the Nikon L100 may be a good choice if not for the fact that it cannot use rechargeable AA batteries (as it specifically says on page 14 of the manual). If this is a problem for you a good alternative is the Panasonic TZ5, a fully auto camera with a long 10x optical zoom and many features. The TZ5 does surprisingly well in taking photos of low light wrestling matches, as shown by the following sample pics:
    http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=wwe&ss=2&cm=panasonic/dmc-tz5&z=t
     
  3. XxAn63laxX

    XxAn63laxX Member

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    I wish I was experienced, but my current camera is very old (It's a Fujifilm Finepix 3x zoom camera / not at home so I'm unsure the exact model, but needless to say, not very great! However, even with my Fujifilm I've been able to get "decent" shots every now and again). Will I be able to get great shots with the Canon even if I'm not familiar with the manual exposure controls? or will I have to mess around for most of the show to figure it out? I'd like to be able to turn the flash on, point and shoot. Is this possible with the Canon?

    The Panasonic TZ5 sounds great, but unfortunately is not available for purchase by the time I need (not at my local Best Buy or other electronics stores). The Canon was appealing due to its smaller size and only taking 2 batteries, but the Nikon was easier to grasp in your hand and seemed to take photos more quickly.
     
  4. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    First of all, forget about using the flash for long distance shots. Unless you have a seat within 10 feet of the ring, the flash will do no good. You'll have to turn it off (or with the Canon and Nikon, just don't raise the flash).

    The Canon SX110is should do OK on auto or one of the scene modes (perhaps night portrait) but it will do better if you learn how to use its manual exposure modes. If you buy it be sure you buy some good rechargeable AA's (I think Eneloops are the best but they are hard to find in stores).

    Given your unfamiliarity with manual exposure controls, the Nikon L100 may be a better fit for you as it has more optical zoom. However, the arena may not let you bring it in as they can be touchy about larger cameras. Also the fact that you can't use rechargeable AA's could be a problem. AA lithiums are powerful and have good battery life but four batteries aren't cheap and will have to be replaced on a regular basis.
     
  5. fast1

    fast1 Banned

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    so what is the furtherest distance that a flash will still be effective?[​IMG]
     
  6. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    Most compact camera flashes are only good to about 10 feet.

    The Canon in question has an edge with f2.8 lens for the low light, it's smaller and can use rechargable batteries.

    The nikon has the edge in longer zoom, wide angle, excellent burst mode when you go with 3megapixel images, having 4 batteries should last a long time.

    Due to the rechargable battery factor, smaller size and faster lens I'd choose the canon. Also take advice of others, try not to zoom in much as this allows less light to hit the sensor and make darker or blurred images. Get good rechargable batteries. I know some folks recommend eneloopbatteries, but I choose name brand batteries with the highest capacities. I think the last ones I bought were Duracells and they had a 2650ma capacity. A freshly charged set of these should last a long time at an event, and you can easily carry a spare set just in case.

    Last you should read up on tips foro taking low light photos and read the manual for the camera so you can set it for optimal low light action photos.
     
  7. samwatso231

    samwatso231 Member

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    I agree with Andy, the Nikon may suit you better.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2009
  8. XxAn63laxX

    XxAn63laxX Member

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    I actually just purchased the Canon this evening and have been messing around with it a bit. Wish I knew more about the manual settings because I'd love to know if my photos are going to turn out alright on the auto setting. I assume they HAVE to be better then what I would get with my old camera (Fujifilm FinePix A345).. right? ha ha

    Only thing that's bothering me thus far about the Canon is that it isn't numbering my photos so that I know how many are left on my card. On my Fuji, it descends so you know how many you have left.. with this, it just says "Memory Full". I purchased an additional 4GB drive, so I really don't see that being a problem.. I never let my card get THAT full, but still.. if anyone knows how to get this camera to number the photos in descending order, please let me know.. still can't find it in the manual.
     
  9. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The Canon will show you the number of photos left on your card if you press the DISP button at the back of the camera.
     
  10. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Active Member

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    I was looking at the manual for your camera and there's a SCN mode on the dial. If you choose this there is an iso3200 "scene" were it sets the camera to a high ISO speed (3200) and a high shutter speed. This may be a good option to try at an event. Be aware that most camera's anything over 800iso is going to have a lot of noise in the picture.
    for now that's a place to start, and if that's too noisy of an image you'll have to learn how to use the manual mode to adjust the shutter speed and ISO to the optimal setting for your shot.
     
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