Casio EX z-1050

Discussion in 'Casio' started by mnracefan, Jan 24, 2008.

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  1. mnracefan

    mnracefan Member

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    Hi all, I'm new to the forum :) I recently purchased an EX z-1050. This is my first experience with casios (I've always owned a kodak). My question is when I take video of my daughter and upload it to the computer, the video seems to be somewhat pixelated. My friend who convinced me to buy this camera (she owns the exact same model) seems to have no problem with her video that I do. Here's are very clear. Thinking it was the memory card I went out and bought a san disk 1gb 2 class and that still didn't help with the pixelation. I have the movie mode set to the highest resolution which is 640x480

    So, here's my question should I have bought a high speed memory card for my camera instead of a "basic" memory card? Would that make a difference at all in the quality of the video? Or is there something wrong with my camera. I have already contacted Casio and really haven't gotten any answers. Thanks for any advice or answers anyone can give, it will be much appreciated:D


    Extra info if needed: I'm using windows xp home edition with SP2
     
  2. David Rasnake

    David Rasnake News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    The kind of memory, the computer's OS, etc., etc. should all have no bearing on the playback quality of a video file. A high-speed card is nice, but the recorded file will always be the same; the camera itself may perform faster, but what's recorded doesn't change.

    I don't know this camera well, but I have a hunch as to what may be going on: on many devices, there is a setting for resolution size, but also a separate one for frame rate. A lower framerate (15 fps instead of 30 fps, for instance) can cause playback to look jumpy.

    If the image is truly pixelated (and not just blocky or jumpy looking), it may also be a monitor or playback size issue. Are you viewing the video at full-screen? On my notebook, 640x480 takes up half the screen; on a large desktop monitor, not so much. If you're trying to view the video at full screen, every computer on the market is going to have to stretch it somewhat, causing pixelation. If your friend has a different sized monitor, the level of stretch/pixelation may be more or less, making the video look worse/better on one versus the other.

    640x480 is a good TV res video, but doesn't look near as nice on most computer screens, which are 1024 pixels wide at the minimum in most cases.

    Hope this gets you started, at least. Good luck!

    dr
     
  3. mnracefan

    mnracefan Member

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    Thanks so much for the useful info. I'm a little tech. challenged, but I'm trying to learn :)
     
  4. David Rasnake

    David Rasnake News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    Not at all. Based on what you find out from these two items, we can know better what's going on.

    dr
     
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