d5000 lens

Discussion in 'Lenses and Accessories' started by scotty1234, Mar 9, 2010.

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  1. rowman

    rowman Well-Known Member

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    Caleb can you explain about this one more? Is it because with a wider aperture you go for lower shutter speeds that VR is less important or the VR itself is not a big deal in practice and handhelding the camera is not a good way then?

    with PS, IS is quite handy for handhelding, but no idea about these lenses.

    Thanks,
     
  2. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    VR is a great idea - if you can eliminate shake in cameras you can have fewer blurry pictures - but I find, many times, that the blur is more caused by the low shutter speed and movement in the subject, than in movement in the camera. Given the choice I would take a wider aperture over a lens with VR - I know, however, that cost is a major factor here.

    I like VR (or IS) in my 55-200 lens and my PS camera, but in buying new equipment I would prefer a wider aperture.

    The other thing to consider is the use of VR on tripods - it can actually ruin pictures. Most of the time if the camera is still the VR will induce vibration into the lens and cause blurry pictures. Newer systems might be better, but don't be afraid to turn VR off.

    Hope I covered it all.
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I certainly agree with Caleb's comments. As for handholding, that is the only way I shoot anymore, even with my DSLR, even when the subject is a landscape. Still have the tripods, but not the will to drag them around. My Sony DSLR has IS, so I always have it turned on. Why not, no harm. But I know it's not a fix-all. As Caleb explained, if there is any significant motion in the scene a higher shutter speed will be needed, IS or no IS. My Fuji compact lacks IS, but is still useful, even in low light. When using it in low light I simply take more shots, then I can afford to throw away the blurred ones. Not demand or expect that every low light shot will be sharp.

    practical Kelly
     
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