D9300

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Jim Keenan, Apr 9, 2014.

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  1. Jim Keenan

    Jim Keenan News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    Nikon Rumors is reporting Nikon "is preparing to launch" a new camera to be designated D9300. NR says that's all the info they have, but speculates the designation suggests a DX (APS-C sensor) camera with more features than the prosumer D7000/D7100 Nikon DX bodies.

    Breaking: Nikon D9300 DSLR camera on the horizon | Nikon Rumors

    Those of us shooting the D300/D300S at wildlife, sports and other distant or fast moving subjects have been hoping for a replacement to these bodies that would incorporate sensor and processing advances seen in the prosume and entry level DX models, along with a higher continuous shooting rate and buffer capacity for NEF (RAW) files than the D7000/7100. It was long assumed a replacement for the D300/D300S would likely be called a D400, but with the introduction of the D600/D610 as full frame models, some Nikon watchers have suggested the D400 designation may be reserved for something else in the full frame sensor family. The D9300 would logically slot in above the D7000/D7100 models in features and may be the D300/D300S replacement, albeit with a 4 digit number to designate a DX sensor camera. None of us shooting both cropped and full frame Nikons are giving up FF for the new camera, but an updated pro body DX Nikon would sell well, I believe.

    In a perfect world, my D9300 would be a 16 to 24MP sensor with EXPEED 4 processor, D7100-like ISO (or better) performance, a 3 or 4 second buffer shooting full size NEF files at at least 8 fps and the D4S AF system. Note to Nikon: build it this way and I'm buying two.................
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I wonder what the price differential will be over the D7100 and what advantages the D9300 will give you for the money? Probably an increase in size and weight as well as better build quality. Anything else?
     
  3. Jim Keenan

    Jim Keenan News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    If the D9300 specs out as the new pro body DX Nikon, I'd expect it to come in anywhere from $1700 TO $2000 - similar to the D300S $1700 MSRP. A quick guess at what it gives over the D7100 would be latest generation processor and sensor, faster continuous shooting rate (say 8 fps native, 9 with a battery pack like the MB-D10) and most importantly, a larger buffer to handle longer bursts.

    The buffer is the weak link in the D7100 for folks who rip frames - I can shoot 2+ seconds at 8fps with my D300S/MB-D10 and NEF files, the D7100 slows in about half that time. I shoot a lot of kids on short boards doing cutbacks and airs, and a burst can easily go 12 to 14 shots for the whole sequence once you anticipate and get on the shutter and then make sure to keep shooting through the finish. The D300S barely makes it - if the kid cranks out another maneuver right away I can come up short on the buffer. Not a problem if I'm using the D3 or D3S, but then I give up the crop factor magnification since I'm usually shooting the 400 or 600mm lens. Just don't like to use the TC 14-EII unless I have to, and really don't like giving up the extra stop, although the D3/3S can add on ISO and easily overcome that.

    EXPEED4+ processor, probably (hopefully) gets the D4S AF System (the D300/300S shared the 51 point AF from the D3/D3S) - Nikon's got some good hardware already in cameras, they can cherry pick and come up with a pro DX with parts already in the catalogue. Maybe the D9300 debuts the D7200 sensor, not unlike the D300/D90 intros where the pro body D300 appeared first, then the D90 followed with less features but the same sensor/processor. The price differential will probably be so great that for most folks moving up from a D7100 doesn't compute, but folks who need a long buffer with NEF files and a DX sensor to maximize their telephoto reach have to go to the D300/300S right now. The D7000/7100 are fine cameras, but they can come up short for sequences pretty quickly - so I'd guess we're looking at $500 to $750 over a D7100 to get the latest generation processor/sensor and AF system, a better buffer and improved continuous frame rate. Won't pass the bottom line test for many folks, but as I said, I'm buying two if they build it my way.
     
  4. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Well, when you're ready to throw away that D300s, keep me in mind :D
     
  5. Jim Keenan

    Jim Keenan News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    You don't have any Nikon glass, do you?

    I'm shooting the D300S/600mm/TC 14-EII combo at Great Horned Owls that are rearing two owlets behind a friend's house in a nearby town. The nest is about 100' up a eucalyptus tree in a grove and the only clear shot comes from about a 3 square foot spot about 75 yards away. I'm literally shooting through a gap in branches and twigs from trees ranging from about 5 to 30 feet away, then again through a gap in branches near the nest. Basically 1260mm in 35mm equivalents to barely miss the stuff in foreground and near the nest. This shot is cropped - there's a lot of brightly lit foliage from afternoon sun to their right.....
     

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    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  6. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Nice shot!
     
  7. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Sweet shot. Now in my personal wallpaper collection.

    Kelly
     
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