Depth of field

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by swarner, Feb 7, 2009.

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  1. swarner

    swarner Member

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    Whenever I try to investigate DSLR's vs. Point and Shoots, I find very little information on depth of field. Isn't that a major difference between the two or do high-end point and shoots now offer more flexibility here? I want to take fairly close-up shots (but not necessarily always macro) and keep 3 dimensional objects entirely in focus. My Finepix F45fd only seems to focus on one plane and does not extend from there. Whenever I inquire at camera stores they always tell me I need a DSLR to accomplish what I want. However some of these shots will require macro.... Is it possible to achieve what I want with one camera? I will never be able to purchase a macro lens. Close-up filters seem to create photos of poor quality.
    Thanks.
     
  2. swarner

    swarner Member

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    Continuing depth of field question...
    Will a manual aperture setting allow flexibility with a point and shoot? I am looking for an in focus depth of maybe 8 inches.Is there an aperture setting (indoor...homemade soft lighting diffusion box, tripod) which will allow me that much depth when using a point and shoot?
     
  3. swarner

    swarner Member

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    Chapter 3 depth of field...macro
    What is the mechanism inside a point and shoot that allows it to go to a macro mode....without having to change a lens? How does macro mode affect aperture?
     
  4. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    Without going into a technical explanation of the optics and mathematics of depth of field, consider your own eyes. Look at something, then squint and look at it again. A camera lens does something kind of similar.

    By reducing the size (aperture) of the opening the lens has the ability to bring a greater range into focus. This is what is meant by depth of field. Because apertures are measured in f-stops, which are a mathematical construct, they are in a reverse order to what many might consider intuitive: f/22 is a smaller opening (more depth of field) than f/2 (less depth of field).

    Without getting into highly specialized optics and view camera movements, there are only really four controls to any camera: Focus; Aperture; Shutter Speed; Film/ISO Speed.

    If the camera you are using does not have the ability to explicitly set the aperture, it does probably have one or more pre-set modes for "Close-up", "Macro", or similar. Using a tripod (and sometimes flash) can assist in these modes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009
  5. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009
  6. swarner

    swarner Member

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    I have a lot of reading to do! Then if I have more questions, I'll write again.
    Thanks
     
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