Depth of view

Discussion in 'Sony' started by danasan48, Jan 12, 2014.

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  1. danasan48

    danasan48 New Member

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    SIZE=4]I have a Sony DSC HX100V. Good camera. However, I would like to know how to take pictures where I can frame distant shots of, say, mountains, and frame it with close in objects, and have both in focus. What do I have to do? The PHD button on a camera was named especially for me!! (GRIN).

    Mike in Mesa[/SIZE][/SIZE]
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Without getting too technical if you want a close-up object to be sharp and the background to be blurred you shoot with a wide angle of view (in other words, little or no zoom) and a large aperture (low aperture numbers). This is referred to as a shallow depth of field. If you want both foreground and background to be as sharp as possible shoot with a narrow angle of view (using zoom) and a small aperture (high aperture numbers). This is referred to as a deep depth of field.

    There are plenty of resources on the internet that go into more detail on the subject of depth of field. You might want to read something recently posted on this website: FPT: How to Create Depth of Field
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Put the camera on a tripod (resulting shutter speed will likely be low)

    Put the camera in its Aperture priority mode

    Set the zoom to get the desired field width (should not be telephoto)

    Set the smallest aperture (should be f/16 or an even larger number)

    Aim the camera at a point a couple of feet or so beyond the nearest point you want in focus. Lock the AF there, or switch to manual focus.

    Re-aim the camera for the composition desired (called focus-and-recompose), and take the shot.

    If that does not result in a DOF that is great enough, then likely the zoom needs to be less.

    Kelly Cook
     
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