Difference between SLR and point and shoot

Discussion in 'Fuji (Fujifilm)' started by digicam, Feb 16, 2009.

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  1. digicam

    digicam Member

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    What is the main difference between a Digital SLR and a Point and shoot? I am basically still a beginner. I have a FujiFilm Finepix S1000fd. It is my first real camera, I recently upgraded from a HP R927.
     
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Depends on how much of a purest you are. To be all fussy about it, a DSLR is a camera with a digital sensor plus a flip-up mirror ahead of the sensor to divert the image to a magnifying viewfinder. Same as traditional 35mm film SLR, just substitue sensor for film. In a loser sense any digital camera with interchangable lens and viewfinder showing the lens image can be called a DSLR. Note that interchangable also means removable, you are not just adding a converter in front of a fixed lens.

    Your S1000fd is a point-and-shoot class (lacks interchangable lens) camera that is the SLR-like sub type. Styled like a DSLR, but with an electronic viewfinder instead of a flip-up mirror inside.

    Kelly Cook
     
  3. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    An SLR, whether digital or film, is defined to be a camera that permits the image to be viewed directly through the lens that is taking the picture via a mirror. An SLR usually does have interchangeable lens capability; however, it is not a requirement.

    This through-the-lens viewing distinguishes an SLR from a TLR (twin lens reflex) and from a Rangefinder. While a View Camera does present the image as seem through the lens on the focusing screen, it is not via a flip-up mirror.

    Non-SLR digital cameras may either display on the LCD screen what the sensor captures or may use a secondary capture, much like a rangefinder. When the image seen (either through the viewfinder or on the LCD screen) is not what the lens is seeing, parallax error may result, which can make what you see and what you get slightly different unless compensated for properly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  4. digicam

    digicam Member

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    Thanks for your answers.
     
  5. Stevbike

    Stevbike Member

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    One note about the LCD view. This gives the viewer the same view that the senser sees. There is no parallax error like in the older point and shoot cameras. This allows picture like this close-up of one of my model cars.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pixs2009/3544380308/

    This makes even the most simple point and shoot type camera can do nice close-up work. The Dslr allows much greater range of picture taking in all types of picture taking situations. I have a slide copier that allows me to do digital copies of my older 35mm based slides I have on file. Here are some samples of pictures I have done from my 35mm days. Due to the smaller senser in the Dslr, these images are cropped down from the original images.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pixs2009/3546043746/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pixs2009/3545229981/
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2009
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