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Digital Photography below Freezing?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by LinusF, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. LinusF

    LinusF New Member

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    How does one use digitals in sub-freezing weather? A number of cameras, maybe all, have severe limits on use in low temps. For instance CANONs stop at 32F (0C). It is colder than that outside right now.
     
  2. Brian

    Brian Well-Known Member

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    Well, there's a practical limitation for cold weather that all electronics have. The 32F number though is only going to be a concern for long term exposure of the camera. If you take it outside, it should start out at 70 degrees or better, so it would take a long time for the cold to affect it. If you were to leave it in your car overnight and it's very cold outside, you could have a problem. Even so, the ratings are pretty generous for liability reasons. If you need a rugged camera, I'm sure such things exist, or perhaps a housing or case that's more protective.
     
  3. mattfenn

    mattfenn New Member

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    Howdy,

    I use a Canon a510 for work in Michigan and haven't had any real issues taking pictures in cold weather. The biggest problem is the lens fogging from time to time, but I take many cold weather photos. In fact, the biggest problem I have is going from cold to warm. When I was working hurricane damage in Biloxi, I had a huge problem taking the camera from an air conditioned car to the humid heat outside.
     
  4. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

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    Would wrapping it in a woolen case/cover help?
    I imagine this could increase the perceived temperature of the camera?
     
  5. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Keep in mind that you don’t want to expose the camera / lens to extreme temperature variations as that may cause water droplets to form inside the camera / lens case. Not only would this cause problems to your picture taking, but it would also corrode the insides of your camera, over time.
     
  6. Jessica

    Jessica Well-Known Member

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    Thats right Wail.
    Any sort of moisture can spell disaster for a camera. Personally i wouldnt take my good camera out in freezing conditions, I would get a cheaper one for that purpose, just in case.
     
  7. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Aha! But “cheaper” is all relative! One person’s cheap camera is another persons’ expensive camera … would you not agree?

    Most people don’t have two cameras, and unless they are serious hobbyist or professional photographers then the one camera is all they have. That said, I would agree with you, if someone is on the look out for an expensive camera then they should also contemplate a cheaper model that can be used under more harsh environments.
     

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