DSLR ... baby steps ...

Discussion in 'Photography' started by KCook, Oct 2, 2009.

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  1. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I have several decades of experience with 35mm SLR cameras. But only recently picked up a Sony A200, my very first DSLR. In some ways quite familiar compared with my old 35mm cameras, in other ways, wildly different. For example there are the various shooting modes and image treatments. I have now done a little landscape study in a park, and put up samples from that -

    http://needsabeach.com/Albums/CityPark/

    Don't forget to click on the Pg2 link at the top to see the 2nd page.

    Kelly Cook
     
  2. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    Some very nice looking photos!
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Major kudos should go to the landscape architect for that park as well !!!
     
  4. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Thanks for illustrating the different modes. While I like the DRO feature, it does appear that maximum DRO flattens out the colors a bit too much.
     
  5. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I had high hopes for the DRO deal. But, looking at samples from Sony reviews, it's not hard to find evidence that max DRO strength does tweak the colors. I've asked about this on a Sony forum, and been told that Sony chose to dial back their DRO feature on the A200 model. Presumably due to criticism of it's effects with earlier Sony models. So instead of DRO, I'm experimenting with reducing contast to extend DR. It could also help if the A200 had tone curves, but it lacks this feature. From my shopping research it looks like Nikon and Olympus play the tone curves game best. Canon has 'em, but not with a lot of choices.

    Kelly

    PS - There is now a good discussion of the DRO game on that other site -

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1037&thread=33238710
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2009
  6. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    The Sony cited above is now history, I have moved on to a Canon EOS 50D. The EOS cameras have a nice set of in-camera controls for image treatments. Contrast, color saturation, all that stuff. Which more important for a DSLR than the usual point-and-shoot. As the default images from a DSLR are often a bit flat, even a lot flat. And these controls can fix that. Known as "Picture Style" for the EOS, all DSLR cameras have these controls, but other brands will use different labels, and the strengths of these effects will be a little different from the EOS processor. You may find posts on forums saying these controls apply only to JPG images, not RAW. Which is not completely true, all of the images in the sample set below started life as RAW images. Linky for those samples -

    Picture Style slideshow

    Kelly
     
  7. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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  8. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Your 50D does a nice job creating photos that are well-saturated (but not overly so).
     
  9. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I thought it interesting that there are saturation differences between Auto, Landscape, and Portrait modes. The Auto mode really uses the Standard picture style, which has quite a bit more saturation than Faithful (the RAW baseline). Within each of these Picture Styles; Landscape, Portrait, and Standard; you can dial in further adjustments in saturation. But those fine adjustments are only available in the PASM shooting modes. Lots of games to be played here!

    Kelly
     
  10. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Two simple rules: Look for good lighting, don't even bother shooting if the light is bad. Either shoot JPG or bump up the RAW saturation. Straight RAW is dull as can be.

    Kelly
     
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