Macro?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by queshy, May 20, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. queshy

    queshy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi,
    So lately I've been into taking pictures of closeup stuff. The most I know is that this is called "macro photography" lol. I'm using a canon A640. Where can I find a comprehensive guide that covers anything? I'm always getting blurry pictures!
     
  2. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    There should be a button or menu setting that allows you to use a "Macro" mode. On many Canon cameras, it's a button that has a Flower (Tulip) type logo. You can also adjust this in a manual mode if you prefer, but it should work in auto mode as well.

    If you are still confused, look in the index of your A640 manual for "macro" and you will certainly get results.
     
  3. queshy

    queshy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Great, thanks

    I actually knew that the tulip = macro, but I can't tell the difference between using it and not. I was hoping for some online resources, but I'll check the manual. Most of the resources i found online were far too complicated for the beginning, so I figured I'd post here.
    Thanks for the advice!
     
  4. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    When you are in macro mode, the tulip should appear on the LCD itself. That is the verification that you are in macro mode.

    Hope that helps.

    -gautam
     
  5. queshy

    queshy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    lol, sorry for the misunderstanding. You must think I'm pretty dumb haha.

    What I really meant to ask was: "I can't tell the difference between a photo I snapped in Macro mode vs. a photo I snapped in regular mode". I'm pretty sure it's just because I don't know how to take good pictures. I think I'll head down to chapters and find a nice book about digital photography - I'm tired of just pointing and shooting - my camera is probably capable of taking much nicer pictures!
     
  6. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Blurry pictures mean one of four things:
    • Too slow a shutter speed
    • Camera movement
    • Subject movement
    • Improper focus

    Selecting a faster shutter speed or using flash (or both) and using a tripod can help. Of course, with digital, you can also increase the ISO to get faster shutter speeds.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2007
  7. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No, not at all.

    Yes, the A series cameras have quite a bit more manual features for you to play with as an amateur photographer. You can adjust all kinds of things that you would on a standard dSLR, but without the image fidelity of course.

    There are numerous reasons why an image might not look "good." It's worth trying out a few settings, playing with options, to get a feel for it.
     
  8. queshy

    queshy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, I've been experimenting lately, taking pictures on almost every setting I can find. There are so many options!
     
  9. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's what I love about photography. Hope you get the results you are looking for!
     
  10. queshy

    queshy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, I'll try to bump up the ISO a bit (i'm aware that noise will occur though).
    About the shakiness, I find I have a pretty steady hand. The problem is that the pictures never seem to be in focus anyway. I find that when I snap a picture, it looks identical on the camera's LCD as it does on my monitor. I can never manage to get that effect where the subject is in focus, and hte background is kind of blurred out.

    And yes, Gautam, I agree with you. I find it cool how you can have so much control - it allows people ot be very creative.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page