Macro?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by queshy, May 20, 2007.

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  1. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

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    @queshy - If you are using autofocus, you need to press down the button halfway to give the camera time to get into focus. I find that you can "confuse" the processor a lot of times in unusual settings (like macro) when you press all the way down in autofocus. I think this applies to all A series cameras, but I have the A95.

    If that doesn't work, try to focus manually.
     
  2. queshy

    queshy Member

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    Yes, I have figured out that pressing it half way down helps it focus. What about optical zoom? When doing closeups, should I use zoom?
     
  3. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

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    Optical zoom is usually fine if you have a steady hand, but digital zoom is useless for those with even the most steady hands...you MUST have a tripod to get (decent) digital zoom images.

    For macro mode, a bit of optical zoom won't hurt. No zoom is probably best, however.
     
  4. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    I find most P&S cameras, film or digital, to be less satisfying for macrophotography than SLRs due to the lag time between autofocus acquisition and shutter release. In fact, I find that most of my macro work is taken in manual focus mode. And no matter how steady one is it is extremely difficult to not have some camera movement at the point of shutter release which is magnified by the shallow depth of field inherent in macro photography. It is for that reason that a tripod is used for this type of photography so frequently. Flash can help by controlling the light source, but even then I recommend a tripod if practical. I also recommend using mirror lock up on cameras that have that feature available (SLR/dSLR only).
     
  5. Gautam

    Gautam Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I'd agree. The irony of tripod work is that it's good for long (zoom) and short (macro) shot photography. Tripods are great for anything...I carry a mini one with me for shoots (folds and fits flat in pocket). Like John Doe says, doing manual shots will get more satisfying results in many cases.
     
  6. usapatriot

    usapatriot Well-Known Member

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    This is a macro shot I took today, it was cloudy outside but there was still enough light to take the picture.

    C&C welcome.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. bTaryag

    bTaryag Well-Known Member

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    How far was the camera from the flowers?
     
  8. avisitor

    avisitor Well-Known Member

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    Another thing you might look at is called a closeup lens or closeup filter. If you take your camera to Ritz Camera, they might be able to help you out. Try using a tripod and getting a little further back and zooming. Your camera can't focus that close.
     
  9. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    Good call on the close-up filter. I use a close-up filter in conjunction with extension tubes on a Canon TS-E 90/2.8 lens for macro work.
     
  10. usapatriot

    usapatriot Well-Known Member

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  11. bTaryag

    bTaryag Well-Known Member

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    Those are great pics!
     
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