Newbie question on Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX lense

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Timothy, Apr 26, 2013.

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  1. Timothy

    Timothy New Member

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    After much research, I am looking to purchase my first DSL camera, a Nikon D5100. Since I plan to take 80%-90% of my pictures indoors, I thought it might be more cost effective to purchase the camera body with a much better indoor / low light lense listed in the title above instead of getting the camera with the standard 18-55mm lense kit. Is it possible to use this 35mm f/1.8 lense outdoors to get some adequate looking pictures in sunlight? I would prefer buying the better indoor / low light lense for better indoor quality pictures and use it as my only lense, as long as I can get some adequate looking pictures outside for the small percentage of outdoor shots that I would take. Do you think this is possible? Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Best regards.
     
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Outdoor photos with the 35mm will be fine. But thanks to the DX crop factor, this is not a wide angle lens. For WA shots with the 35mm you will need to make multi-frame panoramas.

    The normal 18-55 will also work indoors, if you get an external flash for the camera's hotshoe. Nikon flash units are pricey (as are every other camera brand), but you can find good 3rd party flash units for around $75 USD.

    Low light photography (without flash) is not super easy, even with an f/1.8 lens. The auto focus will be fooled more often in low light, so extra care will be needed in setting up shots. Focus problems go away with flash photography, since the greater depth of field of using a smaller aperture (thanks to the bright flash) overrides such errors in most cases.

    In most practical cases you will eventually end up with both lenses. Getting the 18-55 with camera will save a few $$ over buying it separately later.

    Kelly Cook
     
  3. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The crop factor takes into consideration the difference in sensor size between the current camera and a frame of 35mm film. For the Nikon D5100, the crop factor is 1.5. This means that a 35mm DX lens is equivalent to a 52.5mm lens for a 35mm camera. That's fine for portraits but terrible for wide angle shots unless you're standing fairly far away from the subject.
     
  4. Timothy

    Timothy New Member

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    Thank you KCook and Andy for your help in answering my question. I very much appreciate it!

    Best regards.
     
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