Night-shooting

Discussion in 'Photography' started by camdig, Apr 7, 2006.

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  1. camdig

    camdig Member

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    OK, so I went ahead and bought myself an A520, since that was the best camera for my budget. Just letting you know, my experience will be based off this camera.


    Anyway, I've had problems shooting good pictures of darker areas. They tend to create this kinda roughness with dots and stuff on the picture.

    I don't use the flash because I want it to show the light and stuff. Are there maybe add-ons or something that helps shoot better pictures of the darker areas?

    Ex. I'm trying to take a picture of the cloudy night sky. I, myself, can see it clearly and stuff, but with the camera, it's completely black.

    Also, would using a film camera work better instead? Or are there digital cameras specified for these sort of things?
     
  2. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    The graininess that you see is "noise" that occurs with digital camera sensors at high sensitivities (ISO) and longer shutter speeds. Higher end cameras do handle this noise better than others, but it's something that all digital photographers deal with. There is some software out there to reduce noise, but if you have a really noisy image, then you'll only be able to do so much. We reviewed Neat Image back in December - it's one software package out there that reduces noise.
     
  3. camdig

    camdig Member

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    Hey thanks for the info! :)

    I just tested this over again in darker areas with 3 different modes. Fast-moving, landscape, and auto. Out of all of them, auto was a bit blurry, not much of those dots and stuff. Fast-moving, lots of those dots, not as blurry. Landscape, perfect.

    All of those modes didn't give me the option to set the ISO/shutter speeds, so I don't know what they are. But whatever it was, it took the picture pretty well on landscape.

    I'll show you a picture of what I took of my cloudy sky. I had to raise the brightness on the computer because the camera couldn't go any brighter.

    http://img230.imageshack.us/img230/4606/asd0bf.jpg
     
  4. dlynch

    dlynch Member

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    I learned a lot one night taking photos of smelt (sp?) fishing in Port Stanley on the beach. I'd just taken up photography. Had a new hand held meter and lots of film. So I put my camera on a good tripod and fired away. Got the film back--it was really strange. Nice and bright. No people. Fires were kind of blurred.
    Meter wanted to turn everything 18% gray. So sky was bright; you couldn't see people. You could see ghosts if the people stopped and looked at the fire for a while. The light house was really cool. Exposure? Maybe f/8 and long, say a minute or two.
    It was fun. Learned that my eyes had much better latitude than the film I was using. So I had to learn how film worked and how my meter worked to get the results I wanted to get on film.
    I really like digital photography. I can play and it doesn't really cost anything until I start printing photos. I've got lots to learn and I'm having fun.
    Dave
     
  5. Jessica

    Jessica Well-Known Member

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    Are you zooming in at all when shooting?
    Zooming in will cause these problems.
     
  6. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    camdig,

    You may want to transform this grainy situation to your advantage! If you are going to print the image at all, then try to use an application that would allow you to render the image as an “oil painting”. The grains from the pictures will give these “oil paintings” a more realistic look.
     
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