NIKON D100 Vs D5000

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by darticus, Feb 27, 2010.

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  1. darticus

    darticus Active Member

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    Anyone able to give me some info on this. I have all my lenses but wondered if the D5000 would give me better quality or is it about the same. Is the upgrade worth it? Thanks Ron
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The upgrade is worth it only if you want the features the D5000 has that your D100 lacks - video, live view, larger LCD, movable LCD, more megapixels. But on the other hand the D5000 is lighter in weight and smaller, which may not appeal to you.

    As far as image quality is concerned, I doubt if there's much of a difference.
     
  3. darticus

    darticus Active Member

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    Thanks for your input.
    I guess I like the size of the D100 but the 12.3 megapixels over the 6 of the D100 sounds good. Do you know if there are any sample pix showing the difference in quality from 6 to 12.3. What do you think? Thanks Ron
     
  4. darticus

    darticus Active Member

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    DSLR Vs film quality

    Can anyone answer this? How many Megapixels do we need to get pics with the quality of film? Are digital cameras better in clarity and color than film? Ron
     
  5. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The difference in megapixels only really matters when you're cropping or when you're blowing up the photo to poster size.

    I really can't answer this one as I was never a film photographer. My guess is probably 3.

    Again, I was never a film photographer but my guess is yes. Just like the sound quality in CD's is generally better than LP's and the image quality in a digital TV signal is generally better than an analog TV signal.
     
  6. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    The new D300S is over my budget, but I'm thinking a used D300 should be on my wish list. In your experience are there any serious sensor/processor/IQ differences between the old D300 and the current D5000?

    yer Nag
     
  7. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    Here is my take, having recently upgraded from a D70 to a D200 (I suppose the opposite of what you are thinking).

    Upgrade because you need a camera that can keep up with you. Upgrade because you need controls that fit the way you shoot. Upgrade because you have mastered the D100 and can push it beyond its limits.

    I can almost guarantee if you are counting pixels you aren't pushing your camera beyond its limits. I have 4 16x20 prints hanging on my wall from my D70. Some of those were cropped first. A 6 MP camera can make large prints. Don't doubt that.

    You will never get better photos because you have more megapixels. The number on the box doesn't matter. If I gave someone my D200 and my old D70 and said go - I would put money that for the average amateur or non-photographer the better photos would come from the D70. The D70 has an auto mode and because it can do that it will help fill in where the user cant. The D200 doesn't have that, and despite having better specs, won't necessarily produce better photos.

    I don't mean to be rude - but it sounds like you to spend some time in the camera and learn to use it to make the most of those 6 megapixels - or the 12 in a new camera won't be any better.

    As to the film quality issue - Jim covered it nicely in terms of print quality. It is exceedingly difficult to compare film to digital because of the difference in things like tonal range, color, etc. More megapixels can mean better quality, but often times other specs of the sensor (which aren't advertised) mean much more. Don't worry what numbers you need - go shoot pictures and learn the camera. The D100 is capable of some incredible things.
     
  8. darticus

    darticus Active Member

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    Thanks for all that great info. I do like that tilt LCD feature on the D5000 and the Sony a550. Do you think this feature is stupid? I like doing animal pics without laying on the ground. Ron
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  9. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    Personally I don't like the tilt LCDs. If I want to take pictures from an LCD I get my PS out. I don't mind lying on the ground or shooting from the hip if necessary. If thats the only feature you want from a D5000, is it worth hundreds of dollars?
     
  10. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    My Canon S3 had the swivel LCD feature. I used exactly as you said, for pet photography. This will depend on the exact rotation mechanism, they are not all the same design. But some will also swing out in such a way that you can see the LCD from in front of the camera. Which is handy for self-portraits. And some will flip a complete 180deg, so that the LCD face is against the camera body, which protects it much better than any film.

    The bad news with flip LCDs is that they always come with a thick mechanism. So "bulk out" the body more (darn near ruined the Canon A650 in that regard) and can make eyepiece access more uncomfortable. Camera design is always about compromise.

    Kelly
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  11. CalebSchmerge

    CalebSchmerge Super Moderator/Reviewer News/Review Writer

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    I'll admit that I haven't used live view on the Nikon system, but I must say that most of the time I am on the floor taking pictures of pets, its very quick. They don't hold poses (this applies to young children, too). From what I have read I am wary of the live view system being able to keep up. Maybe I misunderstood some things about it, but I get the impression its a lot slow, like PS cameras are.
     
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