Nikon D50 with lense options

Discussion in 'Lenses and Accessories' started by Quikster, Apr 17, 2006.

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  1. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    I am going to be buying a Nikon D50 and have a couple of options for the lenses that I get with it.
    1) Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX
    or
    2) Nikon 28-80mm f/3.3-5.6G AF Zoom Nikkor

    and then I have an option with both to get either
    1) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF Zoom-Nikkor
    or
    2) Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro Lens

    Does anyone have any experience with any of these lense. I will be using these for general shots and a few events (i.e. Friends wedding, graduation, etc..)
    Also, it is the Same price for either of the 70-300mm lenses is one of these better than the other specifically, or is Sigma or Nikon generally better?

    Thanks
     
  2. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    I have two of the lenses you’ve mentioned, both are Nikon … the 18-55mm and the 70-300mm. In a nut-shell, I have been very pleased with the two of them and have taken 1,000s of pictures with them.

    I do regret buying the Nikon lenses since this means that if I ever plan to change my camera model I will have to either change to another Nikon (if I plan to use the same lenses) or I will have to invest in a new set of lenses. Had I gone with the Sigma, or any none-proprietary brand, then I could effectively use the lenses with any model camera I may get.

    Another advantage of the Sigma lens you’ve mentioned is the Macro capability, the Nikon model doesn’t have this feature. One thing to keep a look out for, weight! The Sigma may be a lot heavier than the Nikon, I am not so sure, but if that is the case then you may find it a bore and cumbersome to carry around.
     
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  3. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your input.
    yeah the Nikon is 16.5oz and the Sigma is 1.29lbs so I'll look at the compatibility difference and see what I like there.
     
  4. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    OK it looks like that seller is currently out of stock so I started looking around how is the
    Sigma 28-70mm f/2.8-4 DG zoom lens with the same Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro Lens?
    Thanks
     
  5. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, I have no experience with the Sigma lenses .... but they should be reasonably good; and again, watch out for the weight.
     
  6. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I'm also now debating if I should just get a 18-70mm Nikon lens for now and get the telephoto lens later.
     
  7. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    If you were to get just one lens, then be certain that your choice with the 18-70mm is spot on.

    You have to keep in mind that the measurements given (18-70mm) are for the lens fitted to a 35mm film-based SLR. For most digital SLRs you have to magnify that lens measurement by a factor of 1.5, so that lens would be – on the D50 – a 27-105mm lens. As you can see, that gives you a good wide angel to a reasonable telephoto; hence, my suggestion that this is the best lens to get for now.
     
  8. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    Hey wail,
    I'm guessing you're going to say the same thing here as you did with the body.
    It isn't just the body that is a factory demo it is the lens too. They both have 1 year warranties, but I would think I would have to heavily use the lense too to make sure there is no damage right away, just like you suggested I do with the camera.

    Do you know if the lenses tend to fail all that often, because I know they usually have 5 year warrantys or in your experience is it rather rare that they fail.
    Thanks,
     
  9. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Quickster,

    You are right, I would suggest you use the lens a lot, too, as it could be damaged. Generally speaking lenses do not tend to fail as often as the body. What I would suggest to anyone buying a camera is to get a UV filter to place on their lens as a means of protection from any accidental hits that the lens may encounter. It is far cheaper to replace a filter than it is to replace a whole lens.

    Now, as to what damages the lens may have encountered; for one if may be out of alignment (the optical elements) due to a drop or being banged about. It could also have scratches at either end (give it a very good inspection, at both ends). Since it is a zoom lens, use it a lot to capture pictures at different focal lengths to get the zoom mechanisms moving ...also check it for any signs of mist that may have accumelated inside it (you will see this as distortions in your pictures).

    You can get a few hundreds pictures taken in your first day, yes I am serious, there is no cost to you other than your time and the few pennies it took off your electricity bill to charge up the batteries. So go a head and shoot a few hundred pictures to test the mechanics of the camera and the lens. Once you have done that give the pictures an inspection.

    Generally speaking, if you can’t see the flaws then there really aren’t any there! But do “look” very closely at the pictures at as big a resolution as you possibly can on your monitor. If you see consistency of scratches, marks, distortion, etc. then you know something is wrong.

    I don’t want to scare you from buying a demo model, but keep in mind that this risk is there with new out of the box items too. Since no one knows for sure if something packed as new was ever opened by a prospective client / customer or not, then there is no way to know for certain that anything being bought was mis-handled or not.

    So, give it a good test-drive and see how it fares for you. If at the end of the 2nd day you are all happy with the results you are getting then you are OK for a few good years, hopefully.

    Keep in mind that these cameras are built for the average person like you and I, and Nikon (or any other good manufacturer) do expect them to be knocked about a bit. They are not as sturdy as the top of the line magnesium models, but they can take a good beating.
     
  10. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    By the way, just a note about Nikon; I was never fond of their cameras and would never have bought my D70 had it not been that there is no more any one selling Minolta in my part of the world. I have been using Minoltas for over 30 years and would never dream of changing that brand.

    I had a choice between the Nikons and Cannons on offer, I took the plunge with the Nikon while holding my breath. It was a huge investment for me and I have to say that the build quality is nothing short of outstanding.

    I have used my D70 to take no fewer than 30,000 pictures over the past couple of years under all sorts of climate conditions. I have banged it while carrying it out in my hand, had it fall off the hood of a car a few times, knocked about by pedestrians, took pictures in poring rain, extreme humidity, sizzling heat exceeding 50 degrees centigrade, and it has fared me well and is going strong. If I am ever to replace this model it would be for sure with another Nikon as I very impressed with its’ features and quality.

    Just to reassure you that you are getting an excellent quality camera from one of the best manufacturers out there.
     
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