Olympus Evolt E-510 First Thoughts Review

Discussion in 'Digital Camera News' started by Howard Creech, Jul 8, 2007.

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  1. Howard Creech

    Howard Creech News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    The diminutive Olympus E-510 looks and feels much like its iconic 35mm OM series predecessors, but the similarities end there.  The E510 may be the ultimate bridge camera; an imaging device that almost perfectly spans the gap between prosumer P&S (point & shoot) consumer digicams like the Canon Powershot S5 IS and mid-level digital SLRs like the Canon EOS 5D.  The E-510 has all the bells and whistles users have come to expect from high-end prosumer digicams, but it also provides all the creative flexibility one expects from a dSLR system camera.

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    The feature rich E-510 is a Four Thirds format 10 megapixel dSLR with on-board (works with any lens mounted) mechanical/digital image stabilization and a cutting edge Supersonic Wave Filter dust reduction system. More important to P&S digicam users graduating to modular imaging platform, the E-510 sports a new N-MOS (CMOS) sensor that allows (unlike the vast majority of dSLRs) the bright (230,000-pixel) 2.5-inch LCD screen to be used for composing images. 

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    Equally impressive is the E-510’s ergonomic footprint - this digital camera is as compact and easy to use as many of today’s long zoom P&S digital cameras.  Consumers who like the convenience and immediacy of P&S prosumer digicams will adore the E510.    Construction is robust (polycarbonate body shell over a metal alloy frame) and all controls are logically placed and easily accessed - plus the E-510 provides direct access to white balance, AF mode, ISO/sensitivity, and metering options.  This snazzy little dSLR is targeted at serious amateurs and was obviously designed by photographers for photographers. 

    As a dSLR, the E-510 can hold its own nicely when compared to its rivals (the Nikon D80, the Canon 30D, the Pentax K10D, and the Sony A100) and is available in a competitively priced body only version, or with a surprisingly good Olympus Zuiko Digital f/3.5-f5.6/14-42mm (28- 84mm equivalent) ED kit lens, or (two lens kit) with the 14mm-42mm and an Olympus Zuiko Digital f4.0-f5.6/40-150mm (80mm – 300mm equivalent) zoom.  

    Stay tuned for our full review, coming soon!

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  2. avisitor

    avisitor Well-Known Member

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    Do you think it's worth upgrading to the E-510 from the E-500 (body only, of course)
     
  3. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    That's definitely a good question. The fact that the E-510 has in-camera mechanical image stabilization is a big factor. The Live View feature may be a factor for some, but wouldn't be for me. I'm perfectly happy using the viewfinder.
     
  4. Howard Creech

    Howard Creech News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

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    That's a tough question - I really liked the E510 and if it were me I would probably make the jump. IS would certainly be a factor - especially with your 40-150 zoom. Check out the full E510 review (soon) and that may help make your decision easier.

    Howard
     
  5. avisitor

    avisitor Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking into going in the 300-400mm range as well. I'm anxiously awaiting the review!
     
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