Photos of mountains

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Fable, May 11, 2006.

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  1. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

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    I recently took a whole lot of mountain photos in New Zealand with my FZ30.
    Unfortunately most turned out washed out and dull, I dont know what I did wrong.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    without really seeing what you are talking about it is harder to suggest anything. It might have been set to too high an ISO level (smaller number) or perhaps it wasn't focusing on the right area, or you can also sometimes set the type of lighting in a P mode which is frequently a problem (i.e. Flash, Sun, florescent, incandecent...)
     
  3. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    Quikster, instead of ISO level, do you mean aperture? The ISO level is the sensitivity - smaller numbers (like 100) are less sensitive than ISO 400. The aperture opening uses those reverse numbers - a large aperture has a small number (like f/2.8).

    It does sound like Fable had some exposure issues or that the color settings on the camera could be bumped up. An easy way to play around with exposure, you can always get focus/exposure lock with very little of mountain in the picture (more sky). Then, reframe the shot to include the right amount of mountain that you had planned. This sort of tricks the camera to compensate for more light, so it takes a shorter exposure.
     
  4. dlynch

    dlynch Member

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    Some things have caused me concern about mountain photography.

    I can sure make them look small. Tilting the camera to get the whole mountain in causes it. Wish my camera had swings and tilts. ;)

    Exposure too...when they're back lit and need some extra help, or when they're snow covered. My meter wants to make them 18% gray.

    Atmospheric haze (sp?) too....so I use a UV filter or polarizing filter.

    Dave
     
  5. Jessica

    Jessica Well-Known Member

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    There is usually mist/fog near mountains. Although you cant see it always with your eye, the camera will magnify it giving it a washed out look.
    Also your metering mode plays a big part. What metering were you using?

    And yes, a polarizer is highly recommended for these types of shots!
     
  6. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

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    Yes Ben, I think there were exposure issues. Still I dont know exactly what went wrong.

    Where can I get a polarizer from to fit this camera?
    Must I buy it from Panasonic?
     
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