Polarizers

Discussion in 'Lenses and Accessories' started by Fable, May 11, 2006.

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  1. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

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    Can someone explain to me what a polarizer is?
    When would I need to use one of these?
     
  2. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    you use it in bright sunlight to cut down on glare and such. It also helps protect your lens from scratches.
     
  3. Jessica

    Jessica Well-Known Member

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    I want to know what the difference is between polarizers.
    There is linear and some other types. Dont they all do similar things?
     
  4. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Basically, a Polarizing filter reduces glare and reflections from shiny surfaces such as water and glass – it will not have any effect on metal. It also dims light blue sky without affecting other colours much (it does not make grey skies bluer)!
     
  5. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    For lens protection I would suggest the use of a UV filter (much cheaper and gives better results – i.e. less alterations to image).
     
  6. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    This is what I use as well you can pick up a UV filter from Best buy or circuit city for ~$10. This is especially important if you are shooting at a beach or in other grimy conidtions and/or your lens is barely protected by the front plastic.
    Since on a P&S camera you can not replace your lens and a DSLR your lens is very expensive and you don't want to have to replace it due to getting scratched $10 is a bargain for protection.
     
  7. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

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    Only $10? Dumb question, but it cant cause any damage to the lens can it?
    Im afraid of using cheap products..
     
  8. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    It can't cause any damage, unless you screw the filter in too tightly and damage the threads (pretty hard to do). It's really just another piece of glass to protect the lens.
     
  9. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    one thing to note though in low light situations you are adding one more piece of glass so you'll need slightly more light but its not a big deal and if you have to you can take it off for a few minutes and put it someplace safe while you get that shot you need.
     
  10. FZ20

    FZ20 Active Member

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    Aren't they mostly meant for bright sunlight?
    I dont think anyone would use a polarizer in low light?
     
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