Question About Canon Powershot G10

Discussion in 'Canon' started by blabus, May 15, 2009.

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  1. blabus

    blabus Member

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    I was looking at the Powershot G10 in Best Buy today, and I had never heard of it before until I saw it in the store. I've been looking for a 'prosumer' type compact (something in between a point-and-shoot and a DSLR), and I was leaning towards the Panasonic DMC-LX2 (except for the fact that you can't find them anywhere :)).

    Anyway, in the reviews of the G10 online, they said that the ring around the lens can be removed, allowing you to add an adapter for use with filters and other lenses. So, I was just curious if any G10 owners had done this, and have any opinions on it.

    Thanks for any help!

    P.S. Also, feel free to suggest any other prosumer compact cameras.

    P.P.S. Alright, one more question- what's the largest print size (with high quality) that can be obtained with the G10's 15 megapixels?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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  3. blabus

    blabus Member

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    No, not yet. Looks like I'll have to though, you guys have some great reviews. The funny thing is, I've used NotebookReview for a couple years now, and never once did I notice or click on the Digital Camera tab at the top of the page until today. :)
     
  4. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    You might want to read this review/comparison of the G10 and a $40,000 Hasselblad.

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/kidding.shtml

    Dennis

    PS For what it's worth, I've had 20" x 30" fine-art prints made from my G9 12 MP images.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2009
  5. blabus

    blabus Member

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    Wow. Now that's quite interesting. :)

    So would that mean that something like the Nikon D40 with its larger SLR sensor and better optics could compete with the Hasselblad as well, or does the G10s 15 megapixels put it ahead of even entry-level DSLRs?
     
  6. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    The D40 has a larger sensor, and you can purchase high quality lenses for it. It's a different camera than the G10. Here's another review of the G10, with a different perspective. There is a section in it comparing the D40 to the G10 at high ISO, which is the problem area for small sensor cameras.

    http://www.kenrockwell.com/canon/g10.htm

    The decision to get a G10 vs a D40 is a decision to go with a DSLR or stick with a compact, high-end point and shoot. Convenience vs higher image quality and versatility. However, you will read on other forums where folks with DSLRs do not want to always drag all their DSLR gear with them, and perfer to simplify their lives by downsizing to a high quality P&S camera kit, or just get one to add to their kit for a carry around camera.

    Dennis
     
  7. blabus

    blabus Member

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    Hmm, that does make sense. Although since I'm still an amateur photographer, I probably wouldn't be using additional lenses right away. I looked at both the G10 and the D40 in Best Buy, and the G10 was much nicer to carry around- but there's a sale right now at my Best Buy and the D40 with 18-55 lens is $400! Decisions. :)

    Ultimately though, the D40 is always going to outperform the G10 in low-light/indoor photography, because of the larger sensor, correct?
     
  8. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the D40 will outperform the G10 in low light conditions.

    I would have gotten a D40 last year, when I was considering my G9, but I didn't want to get started again with larger cameras, and all the added expense and weight of more lenses and other options. (I carried/used a Nikon FTn system for about 20 years) I wanted small, convenient, and plenty of manual controls. The G9 fit the bill then, and it still does for me. However, there have been plenty of times that I wished I had a DSLR.

    The funny thing is I have since purchased the Canon tele and wide converters for my G9, plus external flash (430EX II), and accessories. I now carry it all in a DSLR bag! I expect to be flamed over this :-( However, I carry my G9 most of the time without all the lenses and accessories, using only a belt bag.

    If you haven't read the DCR review of the D40, then be sure to do so. I think the first sentence in the Conclusion says a lot; "The Nikon D40 is the 'gateway drug' into the world of digital SLRs."

    http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=2992

    Dennis
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2009
  9. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    It's hard to decide between the convenience of a point and shoot and the quality of a DSLR. I've been trying to make that decision for months. I have a p&s that I carry in my pocket - nice and convenient. Do I really want a DSLR that I have to lug around in a bag? If I had one, would I use it or leave it home because of the size and weight?

    There's another issue (for me, anyway). Ultrazooms can be very useful and they are smaller and lighter in weight than a DSLR. They don't require any extra lenses and most of them have extensive manual controls. Perhaps this is the ideal blend between convenience and quality?

    Decisions, decisions.
     
  10. blabus

    blabus Member

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    My current camera is actually an ultrazoom, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ3 (fairly old). While you do get the added zoom range, ultimately an ultrazoom still isn't going to produce photos any better than any other point an shoot, since they still have the same sensor and optics (generally).

    For me, the big draw toward the DSLR is without doubt the superior photo quality (especially in low light/indoors).

    However, I do agree with you, in that in terms of feature for feature tradeoff, an ultrazoom would seem to fill the P&S-DSLR gap quite well (unless of course you need something pocketable).
     
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