Question About Canon Powershot G10

Discussion in 'Canon' started by blabus, May 15, 2009.

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  1. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    If you want to stick with an ultra-zoom, look at the Canon SX10 IS, it has performed well against the competition.

    http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=3789

    If you want to look seriously at DSLRs, then you might want to start another thread with that target audience. I don't have a DSLR, and there are lots of factors and decisions to consider. Most I've read say to first consider the lenses you will want, and then get the body that will accommodate them. You tend to end up married to the brand then. Your long-term investment is the lenses, not the body.

    Dennis
     
  2. rp2s

    rp2s Active Member

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    Hey guys,

    I'm enjoying reading these posts, as I think the Canon G10 is an awesome camera, as long as you keep the ISO at 200 or less.

    I agree with Andy, as I was in the same (sort of) situation last month. I finally decided to sell my Pentax ist DS dSLR (same 6mp sensor as the Nikon D40) with 3 lens plus an external flash and purchased a new Fuji S100fs ($480 @ B&H Photo, I think it's down to $465 now). All I can say is, WOW. What a camera. 11MP Fuji Super-CCD sensor (about double the size of other ultra-zooms) 14.3x stabilized zoom (28-400mm) plus full manual control and more features than you can think of.

    Oh yes, I really like my Fuji, especially at this price. It originally sold for $800. I think the newer ultra-zooms have really come a long way in photo quality.

    Hope this helps a bit.
     
  3. blabus

    blabus Member

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    Basically, it seems to me that the only thing ultrazooms offer over DSLRs is the large zoom range in a single lens (and I guess if you're a big movie person as well, then they have that advantage too). But if you don't need such a zoom range or movie mode, and you're going to carry such a large camera around either way, than I would think a DSLR would be better; one, because of the increased image quality, and two, because of the ability to easily swap lenses.
     
  4. denncald

    denncald Well-Known Member

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    This question has not been addressed yet. The adapter tube system on the G10 is quite complicated in comparison to my more simple G9 system. I can use one adapter tube for either a filter, a tele lens, or a wide lens. The G10 can have up to three different tubes, as I understand reading from the popular Lensmate source of these add-ons. You may also need a step or spacer ring to prevent a lens crash with some add-on lenses.

    http://www.lensmateonline.com/newsite/G10.html

    That is another turn-off for me if I were to consider an "upgrade" from my G9. However, it is also recommended for convenience with the G9 to attach an adapter tube to each lens, or filter, to make it easy to add or remove a lens/filter using the bayonet system. This is true, but makes your kit larger to carry. I have three adapters; one for my tele, another for my wide, and another for filters - most often used is the polarizer. This is why I have a DSLR bag for it all. If I only carry one adapter tube, then I can fit my two lenses and a couple of filters in a fanny pack, and carry the G9 in my belt bag.

    Dennis
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2009
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