RAW files

Discussion in 'Photography' started by FZ20, May 29, 2006.

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  1. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    Quikster, I believe you are correct. The RAW format is actually proprietary for each manufacturer and lets you change image settings, like white balance, just like if you had done it on the camera in the first place. Since RAW is actually just the raw data from the sensor, it can be "reprocessed" in any way you want. TIFF is a lossless format (I think) so no compression or quality loss occurs.
     
  2. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Quikster / Ben,

    Thank you, both, for the replies. This very clearly explains to me what I had been puzzling over for a while.
     
  3. SeaMonkey

    SeaMonkey Member

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    Yes, I have the same problem when wanting to edit the JPEGs, you always lose quality each subsequent time you save the file.

    But how can we save hundreds of TIFFs on SD cards etc?
    Its just not viable :(
     
  4. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Or, one could get a CD / DVD writer with Lightscribe and have the name of the CD / DVD etched on to it by the drive itself. Ultra cool, even though it is a bit slow!
     
  5. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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    the problem with lightscribe is that to use that funcitonality you have to buy lightscribe compatible discs which they charge extra for just because they can.
     
  6. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

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    Yes, there is a price premium to pay for the specialized discs; but that is the case with any new technology.

    You should keep in mind just how neat and clumsy-free the whole process is while also making your discs look all that much more professional.
     
  7. Mike22

    Mike22 Well-Known Member

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    Is there any way this Lightscribe can actually damage a disc? :confused:
     
  8. Quikster

    Quikster Well-Known Member

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  9. k8gr8

    k8gr8 New Member

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    How important is RAW to an amature photographer just startig out with manual controls?
     
  10. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

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    Personally, I don't think they're that important. You are just learning manual controls and there's no need to make the whole process more complicated. RAW files require post-processing where JPEGs don't really require it. If you captured images as RAW files and want to post them to a website, or email them to friends, you have to convert them to JPEG anyway. Once you're ready, dealing with RAW files is kind of like another chapter in digital photography - another way to expand your knowledge (or get even deeper into the hobby).
     
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