RX100, LX7, Canon S120, Canon G16

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by wanderintraveler, Oct 27, 2013.

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  1. wanderintraveler

    wanderintraveler Active Member

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    I'm still trying to pick an upgrade for our family camera. I was picking between RX100 or an LX7. RX100 is a bit more expensive hence I was still hoping the price would drop a bit more. Then I chance upon new cameras ie. Canon S120 and Canon G16. I'm still not sure how it differs. The difference I can see is the aperture. S120 has (F1.8-5.7) G16 has (F1.8-2.8) and size. I was told the lower the number, the better. I'm also trying to figure out which has a faster speed on shot to shot time. I don't know which spec to look out for. I happens in my Canon Sx240. I click one shot, then it seems to process a few seconds before it can allow me to click another shot. By that tiime the moment is lost and this happens a lot during school programs. Hence this speed is important for me. What terms among the spec should I look into? Which among the cameras has the fastest shot to shot speed? Is the new S120 better than the LX7 in low light situations?

    Hope someone can enlighten me with your insights or experience. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The maximum aperture (smallest F number) is important in determining how well a camera can perform in low light. If two cameras have the same sized sensor, the one with the smallest F number will probably be able to shoot cleaner, better exposed pictures in low light. Of the cameras you're considering the Panasonic LX7 has the smallest F number and the Sony RX100 has the largest sensor so these two should perform better in low light than the Canon S120 and G16.
    As far as shot to shot time goes, the RX100 should be the quickest, though all are quick for point and shoot cameras. Shot to shot time will be slower when shooting in low light or when the flash is activated.
     
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