Samsung WB500 Pmode/M mode light issue?

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by malarek, Feb 15, 2011.

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  1. malarek

    malarek Member

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    Hello,
    I have a question relating to a rather older camera - WB500.

    I was playing with it and I seem to either have some issues in adjusting the light in Manual and program modes, or it's impossible to do and I just need someone to confirm this fear of mine :)

    I was trying to take nice night pics, in black at white, center of the city so lots of lamps and lights around. However, when I try to set it f3.3, iso 1600 and t1/125 (to take snapshots of people moving) it's way to dark, switching to iso 3200 causes lots of grainage and is still quite dark. the only thing that helps is moving t1/125 to t1/30 - it becomes lighted but the grainage is still quite large and the pics are not as stable, so you can see movement. I tried the same thing with Pmode - and true, it is lighter and no grainage since i can easily use iso 800, but then the snapshot is impossible - you can see people, cars everything moving. switching to t1/250 does not really help...

    anyone has any advise how to improve light on the M mode, or make it more stable on P mode?

    during the day I have no problem with the camera....

    thx!
    Malarek
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    You've nicely illustrated the problem with point and shoot cameras with small sensors like the WB500. When shooting at ISO's of 800 and higher the images come out too grainy due to digital noise.

    Since shooting at 800 ISO gives acceptable results, you have to find a way to get sufficient light into your photo to get a good shot without having to increase the ISO even higher. Shooting at a wider aperture will bring in more light. The widest aperture your camera can produce is at the extreme wide angle position - no optical zoom in use. Shooting at a slower shutter speed will bring in more light as well. But as you found out, shooting below 1/100 second will probably result in moving subjects becoming blurry.

    It's tricky to balance all those options - ISO, aperture and shutter speed - but it becomes easier with experience.
     
  3. malarek

    malarek Member

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    Hi Andy,
    Thanks for your reply.
    The problem is - the widest aperture is 3.3 :/
    So i guess, experience may not come in handy with this camera anyway?
    Magda
     
  4. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Magda,

    There's a limit on what you can do. If your aperture is at its maximum width and the ISO is at its practical maximum (800 ISO) the only other option you have is adjusting the shutter speed. Or shooting in an environment where there's more light.
     
  5. malarek

    malarek Member

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    yes, i was afraid of that :) thank you andy for your help :)
    just a final question then - do you know any other compact camera that would have better functionalities for taking pics at night?
    thank you!
     
  6. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The best compact cameras for taking pictures at night are probably the Panasonic LX5, the Canon S95 and the Canon G12. But for about the same price, or a bit more, you can buy DSLR-like cameras that have much better image quality in low light, the Panasonic G10 and Olympus E-PL1, or even an entry-level DSLR, the Sony A290.
     
  7. malarek

    malarek Member

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    I understand, but it's not about the price - it's a bout the size - i need something in a compact version, rather than traditional dslr... thank you for your advise :)
     
  8. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    The Olympus E-PL1 and Sony NEX-3 are small cameras but have large DSLR-like sensors. As a result they have very good low light ability.
     
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