Should I upgrade to a Canon Rebel?

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by radlations, Mar 11, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. radlations

    radlations Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Budget:700$
    Zoom: Ultra?
    Image Quality: 8
    Wildlife and scenary photography.
    Most shots will be outdoors.
    I like canons.



    Okay so right now I have a Canon S3 Powershot and its served me great. 6mm-72mm with 12X zoom and I think that includes the digital zoom. I've been able to take pictures ranging from the smallest wasp to red tail hawks 50 feet above me. I love the distance I can cover with my standard zoom lens. And the only thing I give up is high quality(sharpness and vividness) pictures. I've mostly been doing point and shoot photography(mainly because animals will not sit there and pose long enough for me to adjust aperture,ISO, and whatnot), BUT I do know a teeny bit about photography so if I wanted to I could do everything manually.


    I've recently tried out a Canon Rebel and I LOVE IT. I want the feel of a DSLR and its power. BUT One thing I do NOT absolutely NOT want to do is have to rummage through my lens kit bag while theres a kingfisher about to take off. (can't imagine how anyone who does wildlife photography would want to). What I want is a standard zoom lens. Something with a BIT more zooming power than the 18mm-55mm. Something that is like my Powershot.


    So the main reason why i want to switch to DSLR is that im expecting higher quailty, crisp, vivid pictures. Better than what im getting from my S3.




    Does anyone know if there are lens for the Rebel that might have similar zooming capabilities as my Powershot? I want a do it all lens. Something that will not cost as much as the camera itself. I guess I don't care much about macro but I want to be able to do landscape too. Where would I get one for cheap...er?
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,278
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Dream on. The closest you will come is an ultrazoom with bigger sensor than your S3. Such as the Fujifilm S200EXR. BTW, I did have a S3 for while, know what you mean about the fun zoom. Birding with a DSLR is not a cheap game ....

    no help Kelly
     
  3. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Messages:
    11,164
    Likes Received:
    48
    Trophy Points:
    48
    There are a few do-it-all lenses available for Canon DSLR's but the best ones, those with built-in image stabilization, aren't cheap. The Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS will set you back $529, the Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC LD $600, the Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM IF about $530, and the Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC AF OS about $400.

    Other good do-it-all lenses that don't have image stabilization but are cheaper than those listed above are the Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD ($290), the Tamron AF 18-250mm F/3.5-6.3 Di-II LD ($329) and the Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 ($299).
     
  4. radlations

    radlations Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Are there any lens that go from about 18 to the 100 range?
     
  5. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Messages:
    11,164
    Likes Received:
    48
    Trophy Points:
    48
    The only one I'm aware of is the Sigma 18-125mm f/3.8-5.6 AF DC OS HSM, which will cost you $339. 125mm is not going to give you much optical zoom - only 7x. Not nearly as much as your 12x Canon S3.

    There are many good ultrazooms that have as much as 30x optical zoom. Image quality is not as good as a DSLR but their image quality is still pretty good in most shooting situations. The Panasonic FZ35, Canon SX20 IS, Sony HX1. Nikon P90, Nikon P100 and Olympus SP590UZ and Fuji S1800 are all available now. Others, the Fuji HS10, Kodak Z981 and Pentax X90, are coming out soon. Prices range from about $250 to $500.
     
  6. radlations

    radlations Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wait a minute I still dont completely understand focal length.

    I thought the lower the first number, mean the closer I could get to an object and take a macro photo. And that the larger the second number, the farther I could be from an object to take a picture.
     
  7. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Messages:
    11,164
    Likes Received:
    48
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I more or less agree with your second assumption, but not your first. Macro shooting can be done in two ways. One by using a zoom lens to move very close to the subject. This is what is usually done when using a DSLR. Another way is to bring the lens itself very close to the subject. This is what is usually done with point and shoot cameras. Neither method has anything to do with the first number of the lens range.
     
  8. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,278
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    38
    True. But when comparing different size cameras the 35mm effective focal length will be the best guide.

    The Canon S3 IS has a maximum optical focal length of 72mm, which in the old 35mm terms is 432mm. The Canon Rebel DSLR models have a crop factor of 1.6x. So a 100mm lens would give you only 160mm effective FL in 35mm terms. The distant birdy taken with the Canon S3 would appear 2.7 times bigger than when taken with a Rebel at 100mm.

    Kelly
     
  9. radlations

    radlations Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hmmm so if I wanted a lens for the rebel that could zoom as far as my camera, I would need something in the 400mm range.


    All of this is starting to make me think I have a pretty awesome camera. I can record video, I can take macro shots, I can take zoomed in shots. I would need like 1,000$+more on a canon rebel to do the stuff my camera can do.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
  10. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Messages:
    11,164
    Likes Received:
    48
    Trophy Points:
    48
    No. Your S3 has a 12x optical zoom, with a lens range that's usually expressed as 36mm to 432mm. But the S3's real lens range is much different - the actual numbers are multiplied by a "crop factor" to come up with the numbers that you would see in a 35 mm film camera. The reason for the crop factor is that the sensor sizes of the S3 and a frame of film in a 35mm film camera are so different.

    Lenses that work with the Canon Rebel also have a "crop factor" to enable you to get the equivalent figures if you were using a 35mm film camera. Because of the size of the Canon's sensor, the crop factor is 1.6, as Kelly noted. This means that in order to compare the lens range figures from a lens from a Canon Rebel with your S3 point and shoot camera, you'll have to multiply the lens range figures from your Rebel lens by 1.6. So the 35mm equivalent of the Canon's standard kit lens, 18mm to 55mm, comes to a 35mm equivalent of 28.8mm to 88mm. That means in order to get a long zoom lens for the Rebel that's equivalent to your S3, you'd need a lens with an upper range of 432 divided by 1.6, or 270mm.

    So any lens for the Rebel with an upper limit of at least 270mm will let you zoom at least as close as your S3.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page