Taking pics of clothing

Discussion in 'Photography' started by MarionR, Jun 12, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MarionR

    MarionR New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I need to take great pictures of clothing for sale on ebay. Even though I do it for over a year, I'm still very unsatisfied with the results. I have used several backdrops, gray, white, silver and black. Black works best so far, but not for black clothes. I just started using the silver backdrop and it is awful. I use a Canon Powershot w/ built in flash and two photo lamps, 200 W each. I can not get the objects to lit up evenly and most of the time the pictures are either over exposed or too dark. Lately I tried to point the photo lamps towards the ceiling to get some indirect light and then use the flash on the cam. If I use the lamps directly, the color is often very off compared to the real color of the garment. There is no option for daylight and I have the cam set on tungsten or flourescent light. Any advise is highly appreciated. Thanks, Marion
     
  2. Fable

    Fable Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I thought white would work best?

    Also once you take them, stick them in photoshop and do an Auto Level and/or Auto Contrast, it does wonders bringing out the true color :)
     
  3. MarionR

    MarionR New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I had white in the beginning but it did not work well. The pics got really over exposed then and the contrast was just too much. I use Arcsoft Camera Suite Photostudio 5.5 which has auto correct and all kinds of features that really help out. I think this program works like an easier-to-use version of Adobe Photoshop. I could not live without it anymore.

    Thanks for your advise. I guess basically I need an answer how I can improve lighting. I have tried to have another lightsoruce behind the backdrop, but due to limited space it is a fire hazard.
     
  4. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

    Messages:
    3,018
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A lot of people will use some sort of light tent that uses a white cloth to diffuse the light sources. If you use a white sheet to construct some sort of diffuser, it might help out. If there isn't enough light after diffusing, then you may need to add another source.

    The off colors are probably caused by the camera not determining the correct white balance. If none of the settings in the camera work, the best bet is to edit the pictures in software. You can place a white piece of paper in your frame for a good reference point to correct white balance and then crop it out.
     
  5. nolly

    nolly New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  6. erinedmonton

    erinedmonton New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    try a different camera and see if that changes things, even if the one you have is supposed to be a higher rated/more expensive one. ?
     
  7. barbaracooper

    barbaracooper New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Taking pictures of clothing is really difficult sometimes specially when the clothes are easily wrinkles.. One great solution to the lighting is do post processing (PP) using photoshop.. It would be easier to balance the exposure you want..
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page