Wanted: plenty of zoom, no changing lens

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by Bart150, Jun 22, 2010.

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  1. Bart150

    Bart150 Member

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    I've answered the key questions that define my requirement.

    Budget
    euro500-800

    Optical zoom
    28-200 or better

    Image quality
    as good as possible, given the constraints of the other factors named

    Main challenge
    interior architecture photos

    Special feature
    must have image stabilization

    Additional points
    must have a viewfinder, not just an LCD
    absolutely must not involve multiple lenses

    Grateful for any advice.
    Bart
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    If you can live with less zoom (28 - 140mm), the Canon G11 is probably the finest point and shoot camera made today. It has a great lens, excellent color and sharpness and good performance. It's the only point and shoot camera that still has an optical viewfinder (rather than an electronic viewfinder, which is really just a small version of the LCD).

    If you must have a longer zoom lens, some very good cameras to consider are the Fuji HS10, Sony HX1, Canon SX20, Nikon P100 and Panasonic FZ35. These are not pocket sized and all have electronic viewfinders.
     
  3. Bart150

    Bart150 Member

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    Thanks Andy, that is very useful.
    I'm puzzled that you call the Canon G11 a point and shoot camera.
    I thought 'point and shoot' meant, 'you have to hold it at arm's length, cos there's no viewfinder'.
    Obviously you are using a different definition. Are you classing the other cameras mentioned, Fuji HS10, Sony HX1, Canon SX20, Nikon P100 and Panasonic FZ35, as 'point and shoot'? If not, what is the essential difference? Size/weight?

    Bart
     
  4. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Digital cameras are generally divided into two classes. DSLR's are characterized by large sensors, a mirror box, and the use of interchangeable lenses. Point and shoot cameras are everything else.

    However, there are so many variations in both categories it probably makes more sense to divide them further. For instance the Fuji HS10 and the others are considered SLR-like ultrazooms. There are cameras like the Panasonic DMC G2 that are considered micro 4/3 cameras (not quite DSLR's but more than point and shoots).

    But the Canon G11 is in a class by itself. It looks like a point and shoot camera and uses only one lens. It doesn't have a mirror box. But in its ability to take very sharp, great looking pictures, it's like a DSLR.
     
  5. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about the Euro prices, but there are DSLR zoom lenses with that range of focal lengths. You could simply have a camera shop fit such a lens to the DSLR body, and never remove it! DSLR bodies, even the "little" 4/3 sensor ones, generally give better low light results than any point-and-shoot.

    Kelly Cook
     
  6. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Kelly makes a good point. For example you could buy a Nikon D3000, a very good intro-level DSLR, for about $460. If you don't like its 3x optical zoom lens, you can buy an all-purpose 18-105mm zoom lens with VR (vibration reduction) for an additional $385. Or you could pick up Sigma's all-purpose 18-250mm zoom lens with OS (optical stabilization) for an additional $480.
     
  7. Bart150

    Bart150 Member

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    For a DSLR + big zoom combination, the most attractive package deal I can find here in the Netherlands is this:
    Nikon D3000 body +Sigma 18-200mm OS (stabilizer), E559

    I’m comparing this option with non-DSLR options such as:
    Fuji FinePix HS10 (zoom 24-720) at E429
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ38 (aka 35 in USA I believe) (zoom 27-480) at E309

    The questions arise:
    Is it worth paying the extra money to get the HS10 rather than the FZ38?
    Is it worth paying the extra money to get Nikon/Sigma rather than the HS10 or FZ38?

    Tricky. Any views?
     
  8. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Yes, but only if you need the additional optical zoom and the HS10's sweep panorama mode.

    Yes, if you don't mind the extra bulk of the DSLR/lens combination and want the best image quality of the three.
     
  9. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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  10. Bart150

    Bart150 Member

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    Thank you, Andy and Kelly. I'm tending towards the choice of:
    Nikon D3000 body + Sigma 18-200mm OS (stabilizer) at E559.

    Two questions:
    Image stabilisation is a must with me. Would that be as good with this combination as it would be with the HS10 or FZ35/38?
    Any other lens to consider to go with the Nikon D3000 instead of the Sigma, for similar zoom range and price?

    Bart
     
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