When is film photography expected to die?

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by Wail, Apr 4, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am just curious as to when do people expect there to be no more film photography?

    We have already seen digital cameras outsell film based cameras; and Nikon has recently announced that it was discontinuing – almost – all of its’ film based cameras .. and hence it is expected that the rest of the manufactures will follow up with that same strategy over the next couple of years at the most.

    So, when will we see the end of film based photography? I would like to hear others’ views on this
     
  2. Ben Stafford

    Ben Stafford Site Admin

    Messages:
    3,018
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't think we'll ever see the complete death of film. There are people that simply like the things that you can do with all the different kinds of film. I think it will become very "niche-y", but it will never completely die. There will be camera shops that still repair film cameras for a while.
     
  3. goblin

    goblin Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Personally i believe... and hope that film will never die... There are far too many things you can do with film, that cannot (at least for the moment) be reproduced with digital... Like the grayscale, grain, various development processes, .. and on and on and on... As much as i enjoy the ease of digital photography, it simply is still not as beautiful as film produced images.
     
  4. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ben,

    You are correct, there are people who still love, and prefer film based photography over digital, and I am one of them; but sadly we are a few “old timers” and the manufacturers will care more for their pockets than for our love for “old” technology. I figure just like the abacus and a calculator! We can still buy an abacus, but it is no longer mass-produced; not only that, but one would have to go a hard pace out of ones’ way to find one. Another example is the slide ruler!

    Eventually, these “old timers” will pass on with time and I figure that my generation may be the last ones to see film based photography (still photography that is). Even films for the medical profession is shifting to digital, with bigger access to CT scans, MRI, and X rays being digitized the only place I see film still holding its’ place is in the movie industry.


    Goblin,

    You, too, are correct; there is much more manipulation possible with film cameras while taking pictures and developing them over what can be done today with digital cameras; but digital fanatics argue that what used to be the dark room is now transformed on to your PC and all your manipulations can be done just as effective – if not better – on the PC.


    Personally, I will never re-touch, re-adjust, fix, or do anything to a picture once it is shot; no matter how bad the picture may be, once it is shot I never have it touched-up … this would just take out the “photography” out of the whole equation.

    In the end, I believe, as I have said earlier, that we may be the last generation to see film based still photography.
     
  5. goblin

    goblin Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    I agree with you, saddening but true. I too love my film, whether it be 35mm or medium format, and one of my very favorite films INFRARED!!! I hope however that film holds on longer than not.
     
  6. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    goblin,

    What type / brand of medim format camera do you have / use? I have been contemplating getting into that format for years but never took the leap.
     
  7. Jessica

    Jessica Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Do you mean what sort of digital media storage?
    I use SD cards, they are fast and very compact, as well as cheap.
     
  8. Wail

    Wail Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jessica,

    Sorry, but you may have misunderstood my question. I was asking “goblin” what brand of medium format camera he / she was using .. not the memory type but the camera model.

    As I’ve said, I have been curious about this format for years and it is always on the back of my mind. Where I am at, I can get a Hasselblad for a bargain price … but still, I have never been able to justify the price / expense. I would much rather spend that kind of money on some other “toy”, but then I am always on the look out for a new excuse as to why I desperately need it. Now that they have the H2D out, I am taking a serious look at this format all over again. May be something to put in to my retirement plan?

    Here is a link to that 39 Mega Pixel beauty: -

    http://www.hasselblad.se/
     
  9. nitrox314

    nitrox314 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Its coming slowly. The Ritz Camera here just closed. Walmarts are not supporting 1 hour photo anymore, and yet they have the big digital processors that are larger than the film developing machines. Its getting spendy just to get a roll of film developed, and you cannot even get it the way you want unless you have a darkroom. I am switching out my Nikon N75 for the new D-90 here before the week is out
     
  10. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe News/Review Writer News/Review Writer

    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sculpting and oil painting still exist, why would any art form ever completely vanish? As for the masses, most have already foresaken film. Myself, I am only shooting 50 rolls or so a year anymore.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page