Which camera will produce the most real picture of teeth?

Discussion in 'What Camera Should I Buy?' started by elik1111, Jul 13, 2009.

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  1. elik1111

    elik1111 New Member

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    I need to take pictures of clients teeth before and after whitening and to be able to show the results. I would preder an ultracompat camera which allows to notice details and shades of white. Of course budget is important and I would like to acomplish this purpose in the lower price.
    Any sugestions, I would like to have few alternatives.
     
  2. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    If the idea is to take a photo and immediately show it to the client, you'll want a camera with a large LCD. Also, since you'll be using a point and shoot camera without using the flash, you'll need to have good, bright lighting. Assuming that's the case, there are a number of lower priced cameras with 3 inch diameter LCD's that would do an acceptable job. The Kodak M1093, the Nikon S230, the Sony DSC W230 and the Samsung SL620. The Nikon has a touch screen, which may or may not be a problem for you. None of these cameras really stand out as far as image quality is concerned.

    If you wouldn't mind paying more you can get better picture quality. Some more expensive cameras with 3 inch LCD's to consider are the Sony DSC W290, the Samsung SL820, the Panasonic FS25, and the Fuji F200EXR. Of these, the Fuji is the best, though it's the most expensive (over $300).
     
  3. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    My concern would be getting the exposure and white balance down to precision terms. Which can best be done with manual control. The easiest budget camera for this would be a Canon A590 IS. Which is no longer current, so you would need to beat the bushes to turn one up. Or spend more $$ on a used Canon A6## series or G-series. Andy, I can't believe I had to 'splain this to a Canon guy :D :D

    Kelly Cook
     
  4. Andy Stanton

    Andy Stanton Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Kelly makes a good point. Good exposure and white balance are very important to taking accurate photos of teeth. Sufficient artificial lighting will take care of the exposure issue and most of the small cameras I mentioned allow you to adjust the white balance.
     
  5. retexan599

    retexan599 Member

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    Not my province, but I should think that the settings for both the before and after should be the same so as to accurately capture the _difference_ between before and after. If the settings are different for each one, the results might be skewed.
     
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