Which software to use

Discussion in 'Software' started by nancyannp, Mar 22, 2011.

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  1. nancyannp

    nancyannp Member

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    i have just purchased a Canon Rebel and it came with 6 software programs....Digital photo professional, EOS utility, Picture Style editor, Zoom browser EX, Photostitch and WFT Utility...do I need to install all these to upload my pictures to my computer or just one of these. I do have photoshop elements, and I use picasa...,.i also upload to snapfish.
     
  2. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    I just got a Canon, so have been taking a quick look at that software. Actually none of it is needed to download images from the camera. The usual freebie photo apps like Microsoft's Windows Live Photo Gallery can perform the Import function for that.

    Where Canon's programs are nice is in digging down into the camera settings for an image. Beyond the depth of the EXIF data displayed by most photo apps. Either the Digital Photo Professional program or Picture Style editor will show those settings. The Photo Professional will also provide basic image editing. The Picture Style editor, with USB connection to camera, will provide a way to upload settings back into the camera's controls (at least on the EOS 50D, no sure for a Rebel). So, if you have an interest in the camera's more advanced settings, you will want to have at least one of those two programs installed.

    Have to say I'm disappointed in the so called Digital Photo Professional program. Not nearly as full featured as Adobe's Elements. Think I will likely end up using the Picture Style program once in a while, but otherwise shelve this Canon software (I already have Elements).

    Kelly Cook
     
  3. nancyannp

    nancyannp Member

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    Thank you for this info, being a newbie it can all be overwhelming, doing as much research as I can. Am a bit confused on Raw Images...I assumed that the Digital Photo Prof was just for using that feature....should I always upload the image as a raw image, is that advisable?? or not play with that until i am a more seasoned amature..lol





     
  4. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    You're right about the Professional editor, it's for working directly with RAW images. Which, in Canon speake, are the CR2 file extension.

    Your camera can be set to shoot RAW, or JPG, or both at the same time. The simplest case is to shoot only in JPG, then no worries about whether software down the line will take a CR2 format. So things may go smoother, starting out, if you just stick to JPG. For casual viewing you will not be able to see any difference in image quality between a JPG or CR2 image.

    Most of the other freebie photo apps can take a "plugin" that will give them the ability to work with CR2 image too. You have to download such a plugin and install it in the program. Usually this goes smoothly, I have run into a hitch once in a while. So Canon's Professional program is not your only hope for working with CR2 files.

    If "upload" means to the internet, then your CR2 files are out. All internet photo uploaders will take JPG, really expect JPG. So for any internet upload you will need to export a CR2 file to JPG prior to the upload. Any program, Canon Professional, or one of the freebies (with plugin) that does take the CR2 format, can perform that export.

    My customary drill is to shoot RAW with the camera. Work with the image in this RAW format as long as possible. Then export to the JPG format just before uploading to the internet. (Or for E-mail as well). But I have lots of software and lots of time to fuss with it. Shooting JPG from beginning to end is certainly simpler.

    Kelly
     
  5. nancyannp

    nancyannp Member

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    Thanks Kelly..I think I will stick with Jpeg format for now. Brief explanation of what exactly RAW format means and what is the benefit of shooting in this format?




     
  6. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Short verison: RAW is the native data provided directly from the camera's sensor (technically NOT true, but close enough for working purposes). JPG is a version of the image that has been processed to compress the image data into a smaller file size. Hopefully in a way that the viewer will NOT notice any difference. And in most cases, especially for CASUAL use, that is perfectly true. Much, much more on these links -

    RAW vs JPEG

    RAW vs. JPEG

    Kelly
     
  7. nancyannp

    nancyannp Member

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    Thank You so much..you have been so helpful! I will check out those web sites.



     
  8. denyalmartin

    denyalmartin New Member

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    I using Canon EOS Rebel XTi Software. The best software for the money would be Photoshop Elements. The ACR portion of the software will open the RAW files, you make adjustments, and then open in photoshop elements for actual pixel manipulation if you need to.
     
  9. KCook

    KCook Well-Known Member

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    Oh foo, I will now have to eat my own words disparaging Canon's Photo Professional. Finally got around to applying it in a serious way to an indoor shot (inevitable white balance tweaking needed), and Photo Professional proved to be superb. Where it still takes a back seat to Adobe's Elements is that it lacks "brush" tools for touching up discrete parts of the image. Which Elements has in abundance.

    foot in mouth Kelly
     
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